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 [graphic] National Register Bulletin Guidelines for Evaluating and Documenting Historic Aviation Properties

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U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service

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VI. PREPARING THE NATIONAL REGISTER NOMINATION

To prepare a National Register nomination, follow basic instructions in National Register Bulletin: How to Complete the National Register Registration Form.

The following guidance supplements that Bulletin and is organized according to the section name of the National Register registration form.

NAME OF PROPERTY

The historic name of aviation properties will be used to identify it in the National Register files, the computerized National Register Information System (NRIS), and any publications. If there is more than one historic name for a facility, enter the name that best reflects the significance of the property; enter other historic or different names under "other names."

CLASSIFICATION

Intact aircraft are classified as "structures"; aviation wrecks are either structures or "sites." Other examples of structures are navigation beacons and seaplane ramps. A single air-related facility (such as a hangar, a terminal building, or a control tower) is a "building." An air-related facility with a combination of buildings, sites, structures, or objects is a "district." Refer to National Register Bulletin: How to Complete the National Register Registration Form for definitions and additional examples.

GUIDELINES FOR COUNTING AVIATION RESOURCES

Contributing and non-contributing resources are counted according to guidelines in National Register Bulletin: How to Complete the National Register Registration Form. An aircraft counts as one structure. For air-related facilities count only buildings, objects, structures, or sites which are substantial in size and scale, or that are specifically discussed in the text.

FUNCTION

National Register Bulletin: How to Complete the National Register Registration Form includes a list of historic functions that should be consulted to define both the historic and present uses of the historic aviation property. Only the most predominant functions of the property should be listed. Functions that may apply to historic aviation properties could include: "domestic" (for institutional housing on an air base); "commerce/trade" (for an air-related facility associated with commercial endeavors); "social" (for an air-related facility containing an important recreation hall); "education" (for air-related educational institutions); "industry" (for aircraft manufacturing plants); "defense" (for aircraft, air base, missile launching sites); and "transportation" (for aircraft, hangars, airports, launching sites).

DESCRIPTION

In this section provide a narrative describing the current and historic appearance and condition of the historic aviation property. The narrative should begin with a summary paragraph that briefly describes the property, noting its major physical characteristics and assessing its overall integrity. Additional paragraphs describing the aviation property should support the summary paragraph.

In describing aircraft, use official designations:

. Manufacturer's designation

. Constructor's number

. Civil or military registration number

. Civil or military designation of type or class

. Aircraft's configuration sequence

. Type model number

. Status prefix letters

. Special purpose suffix letters

. Mission designation

. Serial number for the specific aircraft

. Appropriate designations for major components,like engines,propellers, and landing gear, and the manufacturers of the major components

For aircraft, the Description Section should address the following:

. When was the aircraft constructed?

. What are the aircraft's historic characteristics?

. What were the historical influences (such as design, materials, style or function) on the aircraft's appearance?

. What modifications, major repairs, alterations, and other changes have been made over time and when? How have these changes (other than routine maintenance that replaces existing parts in kind) affected the aircraft's integrity?

. What is the current condition of the aircraft, including exterior and interior features?

STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE

The Statement of Significance is a narrative that describes why the historic aviation property was important by explaining how the property relates to its historic context, National Register criteria, and areas and periods of significance. The important events and persons, design qualities, or information potential associated with the property are discussed. The Statement of Significance should begin with a summary paragraph describing the overall importance of the aviation property and should be followed with additional paragraphs supporting the significance of the property and its associated important events and people.

The Statement of Significance should address:

. How the property meets one or more of the National Register criteria

. Do any of the National Register criteria considerations apply to the property?

. What are the areas of significance with which the property is associated?

. What is the property's period of significance?

. Who are the leading individuals associated with the property and what was their role in the property's history?

AREAS OF SIGNIFICANCE

From National Register Bulletin: How to Complete the National Register Registration Form, select the "areas of significance" which reflect the importance of the nominated property. Common areas of significance to consider for historic aviation properties are:

. Agriculture: aircraft engaged in agricultural production, such as crop dusters.

. Architecture: air-related facilities which are good representatives of a type, period, or method of construction; or that represent the work of a master; or that possess high artistic value; or that represent a significant and distinguishable entity whose components may lack individual distinction.

. Archeology: aircraft (or aviation wrecks) and air-related facilities that have yielded or may be likely to yield information important in the history of aircraft design, production, maintenance or operation.

. Art: air-related facilities embodying significant artistic design features, or an aircraft exhibiting significant example of artistic markings or decoration.

. Commerce: aircraft, airways, airfields, and air-related buildings associated with the growth or development of the business of trading goods, services, and commodities.

. Communications: aircraft

or aids to navigation associated with the technology and process of transmitting information.

. Education: air-related facilities associated with conveying or acquiring knowledge of

aviation design, doctrine, or training.

. Engineering: aircraft, manufacturing plants, or research facilities important for aviation technological developments, or aircraft significant for their engineering characteristics.

. Entertainment/Recreation: aircraft used for leisure activities, diversion, amusement, or sport, and aircraft plants associated with the production of civilian recreational aircraft, as well as properties used in recreational aviation activities.

. Industry: manufacturing plants associated with the production of aircraft and aircraft

components.

. Invention: aircraft or air-related facilities associated with the invention or refinement of aircraft design.

. Landscape Architecture: air-related facilities exhibiting significant landscape design

features.

. Military: aircraft, airfields, manufacturing plants, or research facilities associated with the development of

military aviation.

. Politics/Government: an aircraft or air-related facility associated with significant political events.

. Science: aircraft or air-related facilities associated with scientific experiments or other research.

. Social History: aircraft associated with humanitarian missions (for example, saving of life or delivery of relief in times of emergency).

. Transportation: aircraft or air-related facilities associated with the development of air transport of passengers, express or cargo, and mail.

BOUNDARY

General guidelines for preparing a boundary description and justification are found in National Register Bulletin: How to Complete the National Register Registration Form. For historic aircraft, the verbal boundary description may refer to the extent or dimensions of the aircraft and give its location.

PHOTOGRAPHS AND MAPS

Refer to National Register Bulletin: How to Complete the National Register Registration Form for requirements.

 

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