FR Doc E7-24622
[Federal Register: December 19, 2007 (Volume 72, Number 243)]
[Notices]               
[Page 71949-71951]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr19de07-107]                         

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Hastings Museum of 
Natural and Cultural History, Hastings, NE

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent 
to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Hastings Museum 
of Natural and Cultural History (Hastings Museum), Hastings, NE that 
meet the definition of "unassociated funerary objects" under 25 
U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural 
items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.
    At an unknown time, cultural items were removed from an ossuary, 
known locally as the Alma Ossuary, in the area of Alma, Harlan County, 
NE. The 43 unassociated funerary objects are 1 antler implement, 1 
unfinished pipe blank made of stone or clay, 1 stone drill, 8 stone 
scrapers, 2 stone flakes, 1 stone arrow point, 24 stone scrapers, 1 
stone projectile point, 1 point or scraper, and 3 stone scrapers.
    The antler implement was acquired by the Hastings Museum in an 
exchange with the John Bear Estate for Service's rendered and cataloged 
in 1939 (18406). The other 42 unassociated funerary objects were 
acquired by the museum from Robert Stevenson and cataloged in 1935 
(14414, 14415, 14417, 14418, 14421).
    At an unknown time, cultural items were removed from an ossuary 
from Orleans, Harlan County, NE, and acquired from the H.P. Honnold 
collection and cataloged in 1942. The unassociated funerary objects are 
2,887 white shell beads of various sizes (22786).
    In 1936, cultural items were removed from an ossuary on the Hunt 
farm near Orleans, Harlan County, NE, and donated to the museum by A.M. 
Brooking, museum founder, and cataloged in 1937. The 60 unassociated 
funerary objects are 33 round shell beads and 27 tubular bone beads of 
various sizes and strung on a wire (17423).
    Research conducted at the Nebraska State Historical Society 
identifies a number of known archeological sites in Harlan County. Some 
sites are ossuaries and can be found in the area of Orleans and Alma. 
The cultural items are similar to other known ossuary material. The 
cultural items are also similar to known Plains Woodland and Central 
Plains

[[Page 71950]]

Tradition funerary objects and are likely from one of these cultures. 
Although the funerary objects can not be linked to a specific site, 
based on museum records, museum officials have determined that the 
cultural items were intentionally placed with human remains at burial.
    At an unknown time, cultural items were removed from the Marshal 
Ossuary (25HN1) near Republican City in Harlan County, NE. The 1,065 
unassociated funerary objects are 79 ground squirrel teeth, 1 partial 
animal bone, and 985 shell beads.
    The ground squirrel teeth were donated to the Hastings Museum by 
A.M. Brooking and cataloged between 1926 and 1931 (03840). The one 
partial animal bone was purchased by the Hastings Museum from J.W. 
Markim and cataloged in 1933 (12348). The shell beads were possibly 
collected by A.M. Brooking and documented as being part of the museum 
collection in 1943 (22898). The Nebraska State Historical Society has 
culturally affiliated the Marshall Ossuary with either the Plains 
Woodland or Central Plains Tradition. Museum officials have determined, 
based on museum records, that the items were intentionally placed with 
human remains at burial. The cultural items are similar to other known 
funerary objects removed from this site.
    At an unknown time, cultural items were removed from Skidi sites in 
the area of Palmer, Howard County, NE. The 24 unassociated funerary 
objects are 2 metal hinge pieces, 2 catlinite pipe bowls, 1 metal ring, 
3 paint stones, 2 catlinite beads, 1clay bead, 1 bone tool, 1 copper 
bracelet, 1 metal bell, 1 glass bottle, 1 piece of copper, 1 piece of 
cedar, 2 bear teeth pendants, and 5 metal buttons.
    The funerary objects were donated to the Hastings Museum by A.M. 
Brooking and cataloged between 1926 and 1931 (02445, 02462, 03406, 
00494, 03297, 08061).
    At an unknown time, cultural items were removed from ``Indian'' 
graves from the area near Palmer, Merrick County, NE. The 14 
unassociated funerary objects are 2 pieces of galena, 3 metal fire 
steels, 5 meal rings, 3 bone paint applicators, and 1 piece of copper 
attached to wood.
    The pieces of galena, metal fire steels, and metal rings were 
donated to the Hastings Museum by A.M. Brooking and cataloged between 
1926 and 1931 (03409, 03230, 09899). The bone paint applicators and the 
copper piece were acquired by the Hastings Museum from George Debord 
and cataloged between 1926 and 1931 (09696).
    Research conducted at the Nebraska State Historical Society 
identifies at least 15 sites in the area of Palmer. This area of the 
state is known to have been historically occupied by the Skidi band of 
the Pawnee, as well as older cultures. Although the funerary objects 
can not be linked to a specific site, museum officials have determined 
based on museum records, that the items were intentionally placed with 
human remains at burial. In addition, because the museum can document 
A.M. Brooking's work at the Palmer Site (25HW1), a known Skidi village, 
and that the funerary objects removed from this site are similar to 
those described above, the funerary objects from the Palmer area are 
likely associated with the Skidi band of the Pawnee.
    At an unknown time, cultural items were removed from graves on the 
Greek Farm (25NC6/20), also known as Genoa Village, located near Genoa 
in Nance County, NE. The 47 unassociated funerary objects are 4 pipe 
bowls, 1 glass bottle, 2 fire steels, 1 catlinite pipe, 1 pair of 
scissors, 6 metal bells, 13 copper bracelets, 15 musket flints, 2 
partially worked pieces of catlinite, 1 abrading stone, and 1 stone 
mallet.
    Three pipe bowls and one glass bottle were purchased by the 
Hastings Museum from an unknown source and cataloged in 1934 (12814, 
12818). The remaining unassociated funerary objects were purchased by 
the Hastings Museum from Mrs. Phil Cuba and cataloged in 1944 (24713 - 
24715, 24717, 24719, 24722, 24724 - 24726). The Greek farm was the site 
of the last Pawnee villages. All four bands of the Pawnee lived at this 
site from A.D. 1859 - A.D. 1874, prior to the Pawnee relocation to 
Oklahoma. Based on museum records, museum officials have determined 
that the cultural items were intentionally placed with human remains at 
burial. The unassociated funerary objects are consistent with a 
historic burial site and have been determined to be affiliated with the 
Pawnee.
    At an unknown time, cultural items were removed from graves at the 
Phil Cuba Site (25NC4) in Nance County, NE. The 128 unassociated 
funerary objects are 5 buttons, 2 wire coil arm bands, 16 earbobs, 3 
hawk bells, 1 wood framed mirror, 1 fire steel, 1 pair of scissors, 7 
copper bracelets, 75 faceted glass beads, 1 wooden bowl, 1 silver 
concho, 1 trigger guard for a firearm, 1 glass oil lamp base, 9 stone 
projectile points, 1 headdress, 1 metal ring, and 2 metal pieces from a 
shoe.
    One button, one wire coil armband, one portion of an earbob, and 
two hawk bells were purchased by the Hastings Museum from Phil Cuba and 
cataloged in 1933 (11226). The wood framed mirror, fire steel, pair of 
scissors, three broken bracelets, faceted glass beads, and wooden bowl 
were purchased by the Hastings Museum from Phil Cuba and cataloged in 
1934 (12617, 12618, 12621, 12622, 12635, 12815). The other metal coiled 
armband was purchased by the Hastings Museum from Phil Cuba and 
cataloged in 1937 (17361). Two copper bracelets, silver concho, trigger 
guard for firearm, parts of four earbobs, and glass oil lamp base were 
purchased by the Hastings Museum from Mrs. Phil Cuba and cataloged in 
1940 (19842, 19483, 19484, 19485, 19486). The stone projectile points 
were purchased by the Hastings Museum from Mrs. Phil Cuba and cataloged 
in 1944 (24730). The headdress made of textiles, feathers, leather, and 
fur was donated to the Hastings Museum by Phil Cuba and cataloged in 
1934 (13159). The 11 pieces of earbobs, 1 metal ring, 2 partial 
bracelets, 2 complete and 2 partial buttons, 1 hawk bell, and 2 metal 
pieces from a shoe were donated to the Hastings Museum by A.M. Brooking 
and cataloged in 1934 (13187, 13188).
    Museum officials have determined, based on museum records, that the 
cultural items were intentionally placed with human remains at burial. 
Based on museum records, the unassociated funerary objects from the 
Phil Cuba site have been designated as similar to funerary objects from 
the Lower Loup Phase and historic Pawnee by the Nebraska State 
Historical Society. Furthermore, museum officials have determined that 
the unassociated funerary objects are similar to other cultural items 
from the site and are therefore culturally affiliated with the Pawnee.
    At an unknown time, cultural items were removed from ``Indian'' 
graves near Genoa, Nance County, NE. The six unassociated funerary 
objects area two copper rings, three glass beads, and one clay pipe.
    The copper rings were donated to the Hastings Museum by A.M. 
Brooking and cataloged between 1926 and 1931 (03466). The glass beads 
were donated to the Hastings Museum by A.M. Brooking and cataloged in 
1941 (19978, 20512). The clay pipe bowl was donated to the Hastings 
Museum from an unknown source and cataloged in 1941 (20500).
    The Genoa area is the location of the Pawnee reservation prior to 
the people relocating to Oklahoma. Museum officials have determined, 
based on museum records, that the cultural items were intentionally 
placed with human remains at burial. Furthermore, museum officials have 
determined that the unassociated funerary objects are

[[Page 71951]]

similar with other cultural items removed from Pawnee sites in the area 
of Genoa and are therefore culturally affiliated with the Pawnee.
    At an unknown time, cultural items were removed from the A.T. Hill 
site (25WT1), also known as the Pawnee Pike Village, located in Webster 
County, NE. The 3 unassociated funerary objects are 1 metal button, 1 
metal coin or medal, and 1 glass bottle.
    The metal button is an 1800 U.S.C. metal button, which was donated 
by A.M. Brooking and cataloged in 1937 (17662). The metal coin or medal 
was acquired from W.M. Robb and cataloged in 1936 (16058). The glass 
essence of peppermint bottle was donated by an unknown donor and 
cataloged in 1931 (10363). The A.T. Hill site was sporadically occupied 
by the Kitkehahki (Republican) band of the Pawnee from A.D. 1700 - A.D. 
1830. Based on museum records, museum officials have determined that 
the cultural items were intentionally placed with human remains at 
burial and are similar to other funerary objects removed from this 
site. Therefore, museum officials have culturally affiliated the 
unassociated funerary objects with the Pawnee. Descendants of the 
Pawnee are members of the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma.
    Officials of the Hastings Museum have determined that, pursuant to 
25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(B), the 4,277 cultural items described above are 
reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human 
remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or 
ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have 
been removed from a specific burial site of an Native American 
individual. Officials of the Hastings Museum also have determined that, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group 
identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated 
funerary objects and the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should 
contact Teresa Kreutzer-Hodson, Hastings Museum of Natural and Cultural 
History, PO Box 1286, Hastings, NE 68902, telephone (402) 461-2399, 
before January 18, 2008. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary 
objects to the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma may proceed after that date if 
no additional claimants come forward.
    Hastings Museum is responsible for notifying the Omaha Tribe of 
Nebraska; Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; Pawnee Nation of 
Oklahoma; Ponca Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Ponca Tribe of Nebraska; 
Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; and Three 
Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota that 
this notice has been published.

    Dated: October 1, 2007.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E7-24622 Filed 12-18-07; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 4312-50-S



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