[Federal Register: July 11, 2002 (Volume 67, Number 133)]
[Notices]
[Page 45996-45997]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr11jy02-87]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items in the Possession
of the Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is hereby given in accordance with the Native American
Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.10 (a)(3),
of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the
Logan Museum of Anthropology that meet the definition of ``sacred
objects'' under Section 2 of the Act.
     This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 43 CFR 10.2 (c). The
determinations within this notice are the sole responsibility of the
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of these
cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the
determinations within this notice.
    The 27 cultural items are one mud head kachina mask (catalogue
number 1542); one mask (6896); one snake costume (comprised of twelve
parts) (1597.1-.12); one prayer stick (8369); two dance wands (3891,
3892); five ceremonial dance paddles (7026, 7027, 7028, 7029, 7030);
four ceremonial hoes (7020, 7021, 7022, 7023); two dance sticks (7502,
9075); seven painted wooden sticks (7441.1-.6, 8799); one ceremonial
wand (8367); and two prayer or dance sticks (8798.1-.2).
     Between 1968 and 1971, eleven objects were donated to the Logan
Museum of Anthropology from the Herbert S. and Sonia Bleeker Zim
Collection. These include two dance sticks: one from Moenkopi, AZ,
measures 22\1/4\ inches long and \3/4\ inch thick; the other, which is
painted, measures approximately 16 inches long, is in the shape of an
arrow, and has pine twigs and yarn tied to each end. The other nine
objects are six painted wooden sticks carved in various animal forms,
all measuring approximately 12 inches in length, one painted wooden
stick 15\1/2\ inches long with images of corn and a rain cloud on both
sides, and two prayer or dance sticks measuring between 9 and 11 inches
and painted with imagery of tadpoles, cornstalks, and rain clouds.
There is no information available regarding how or when the Zims
acquired these items.
     In 1957, four ceremonial hoes and five ceremonial dance paddles
were acquired through an exchange with the Southwest Museum, Los
Angeles, CA. The hoes measure between 7\1/2\ and 12 inches in length;
one is painted with a rain cloud design. The dance paddles measure
between 18 and 24 inches in length. Two of the dance paddles are
painted with human figures; one is painted with a corn design and
kachina on one side, while the other is painted with a corn design and
has feathers attached. Another dance paddle is painted with a figure on
one side, which is wearing a tableta headdress and is identified as
Shalako Mana kachina. Catalogue information identifies it as part of an
altar or altarpiece and as having been used by the Priestess of
Maurrau. Logan Museum of Anthropology catalogue information identifies
both the hoes and dance paddles as ceremonial. There is no information
available regarding the objects' collection history prior to
acquisition by the Logan Museum of Anthropology. The Hopi Tribe of
Arizona identified the five ceremonial dance paddles as Marau Vaho.
     The snake costume and the mud head kachina mask were purchased for
the Logan Museum of Anthropology through the Bob Becker North American
Indian Fund in 1976 and 1982 respectively. The snake costume consists
of twelve parts: rope and leather armbands; two shell necklaces; a
bandolier of leather, shell, and cloth; a leather purse; a leather sash
with shell and metal tinklers; a cloth kilt with shells; a feather
headdress; a fur container; and cloth and leather anklets. The costume
was purchased from the

[[Page 45997]]

J.N. Bishop Gallery in Los Angeles, CA. A notarized letter signed by
Mrs. J.N. Bishop states that the costume was purchased legally and that
Mrs. Bishop knew the owner of the costume. The mud head kachina mask is
from First Mesa, AZ; it measures 11\1/2\ inches in height, is
constructed of dyed cotton, and was purchased from Gallery II Primitive
Art in Phoenix, AZ. Catalogue information does not provide data on the
objects' collection history prior to acquisition by the Logan Museum of
Anthropology. The Hopi Tribe of Arizona identified the mud head kachina
mask as a Koyemsi Kwatsi.
     One mask was purchased from Walter Randall, Inc., Primitive,
Archaic and Fine Arts, New York, NY, in 1961. Catalogue information
refers to the item as a Kachina cult mask. The mask is constructed of
horsehide with wooden `pop' eyes and mouth and measures 7\1/2\ by 5\1/
2\ inches. Catalogue information does not provide data on the object's
collection history prior to acquisition by the Logan Museum of
Anthropology. The Hopi Tribe of Arizona identified the mask as a Katsin
Kwatsi.
     One ceremonial wand and one prayer stick were donated to the Logan
Museum of Anthropology in 1964 by Helen-Margaret Greene of Tucson, AZ.
The donor's inventory refers to the ceremonial wand as a corn flower
baton with spruce or mariposa lily, purchased from Alfred Joshongewa at
Shungopavi, Second Mesa, AZ, in 1960. The wand is 14 inches in length
and is constructed of painted wood with handspun cotton, prayer
feathers, and spruce twigs attached. The prayer stick is constructed of
painted wooden dowels wrapped in corn leaves with a cluster of herbs
and feathers and is 6 inches in length. The Logan Museum of
Anthropology catalogue information identifies both these items as
ceremonial. No information is available regarding the collection
history of the prayer stick. The Hopi Tribe of Arizona identified the
prayer stick as a Paho.
     Two wooden dance wands derive from unknown sources. They were
acquired by the Logan Museum of Anthropology in 1983. One dance wand is
painted with a tadpole design on one side and a kachina and corn image
on the other. It measures 20 by 3\1/2\ inches. The other dance wand is
painted with a rain cloud image on one side and six pairs of vertical
red lines on the other and is 22\3/4\ inches in length and 6\1/2\
inches in width. Catalogue information does not provide data regarding
the collection history of the objects prior to acquisition by the Logan
Museum of Anthropology. The Hopi Tribe of Arizona identified the dance
wands as Marua Vaho.
     Accession and catalogue records of the Logan Museum of
Anthropology indicate that these cultural items are of Hopi origin from
Hopi villages in northern Arizona. Consultation with representatives of
the Hopi Tribe of Arizona acting on behalf of Hopi traditional
religious leaders confirm the Hopi identity of these cultural items.
Representatives of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona acting on behalf of Hopi
traditional religious leaders have identified these cultural items as
needed by Native American traditional religious leaders for the
practice of traditional Native American religion by its present-day
adherents. Furthermore, representatives of the Hopi Tribe identify the
Society Priests of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona as the rightful custodians
of these items.
     Based on the above-mentioned information, officials of the Logan
Museum of Anthropology have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2
(d)(3), these 27 cultural items are specific ceremonial objects needed
by traditional Native American religious leaders for the practice of
traditional Native American religions by their present-day adherents.
Officials of the Logan Museum of Anthropology also have determined
that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (e), there is a relationship of shared
group identity that can be reasonably traced between these sacred
objects and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona.
     This notice has been sent to officials of the Hopi Tribe of
Arizona. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself
to be culturally affiliated with these objects should contact William
Green, Director, Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, 700
College St., Beloit, WI 53511, telephone (608) 363-2119, before August
12, 2002. Repatriation of these sacred objects to the Hopi Tribe of
Arizona may begin after that date if no additional claimants come
forward.

    Dated: June 25, 2002.
Robert Stearns,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 02-17416 Filed 7-10-02; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-S
Back to the top

Back to National NAGPRA