[Federal Register: March 15, 2011 (Volume 76, Number 50)]
[Notices]               
[Page 14064-14067]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr15mr11-125]                         

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[2253-665]

 
Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, 
Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, DC and Arizona State Museum, 
University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the control of the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau 
of Indian Affairs, Washington, DC, and in the physical custody of the 
Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ. The human 
remains and associated funerary objects were removed from sites within 
the boundaries of the Fort Apache Indian Reservation, Gila and Navajo 
Counties, AZ.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Arizona 
State Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of 
the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort 
Apache Reservation, Arizona; and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni 
Reservation, New Mexico (hereinafter referred to as ``The Tribes'').
    In 1979, fragmentary human remains representing a minimum of 18 
individuals were removed from the Hilltop Ruin Site, AZ P:14:12(ASM), 
Navajo County, AZ, during a legally authorized survey conducted by the 
University of Arizona Archaeological Field School under the direction 
of Madeleine Hinkes. A report prepared by Hinkes describes the presence 
of at least 45 unauthorized excavation pits at this site. The human 
remains were collected from these pits or adjacent backdirt piles. 
There is no record in Arizona State Museum files regarding the 
accession of these human remains. However, the collection likely 
entered the museum in the same year as other collections from the 
summer field school. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    The Hilltop Ruin is a pueblo site of 75 to 100 rooms. The ceramic 
types indicate that the village was occupied during the period A.D. 
1300 to 1400. These characteristics are consistent with the 
archeologically described Upland Mogollon or prehistoric Western Pueblo 
traditions.
    In 1979, fragmentary human remains representing a minimum of 106 
individuals were removed from the Brush Mountain Pueblo Site, AZ 
P:14:13(ASM), Navajo County, AZ, during a legally authorized survey 
conducted by the University of Arizona

[[Page 14065]]

Archaeological Field School under the direction of Madeleine Hinkes. A 
report prepared by Hinkes describes the presence of 65 unauthorized 
excavation pits at this site. The human remains were collected from 
these pits.
    There is no record in Arizona State Museum files regarding the 
accession of these human remains. However, the collection likely 
entered the museum in the same year as other collections from the 
summer field school. No known individuals were identified. The two 
associated funerary objects are one ceramic sherd and one turquoise 
fragment.
    The Brush Mountain Pueblo site contains about 150 rooms. The 
ceramic types indicate that the village was occupied during the period 
A.D. 1300 to 1400. These characteristics are consistent with the 
archeologically described Upland Mogollon or prehistoric Western Pueblo 
traditions.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of eight 
individuals were removed from the Martinez Ranch Site, AZ P:14:17(ASM), 
Navajo County, AZ. The site card was filed in the summer of 1965, 
during the University of Arizona Archaeological Field School, and it is 
possible that the human remains were removed during this survey of the 
site. There is no record in Arizona State Museum files regarding the 
accession of these human remains, although the label on the box in 
which the human remains were found is dated 1983. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    The Martinez Ranch Site contains the remains of a building with one 
to four rooms. Ceramics found on the surface indicate that the site 
dates to the Puebloan period, approximately A.D. 900 to 1400.
    During the years 1976 to 1989, legally authorized excavations were 
conducted at the site of Chiwodist[aacute]s, AZ P:14:24(ASM), Navajo 
County, AZ, by the University of Arizona Archaeological Field School 
under the direction of J. Jefferson Reid. No human burials were 
intentionally excavated during this project. Archeological collections 
from the site were brought to the museum at the end of each field 
season, but no accession number was assigned to them. In 2009 and 2010, 
Arizona State Museum staff found fragmentary human remains representing 
a minimum of 16 individuals intermingled with animal bone collections 
from this site. The animal bones are not considered to be associated 
funerary objects. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    The Chiwodist[aacute]s site is a small pueblo of about 20 rooms 
arranged around a plaza. Based on ceramic styles, the site has been 
dated to the period from A.D. 1263 to 1295. The ceramic and 
architectural forms are consistent with the archeologically described 
Upland Mogollon or prehistoric Western Pueblo traditions.
    In 1979, fragmentary human remains representing a minimum of seven 
individuals were removed from the Pinnacle Site, AZ P:14:71(ASM), 
Navajo County, AZ, during a legally authorized survey conducted by the 
University of Arizona Archaeological Field School under the direction 
of Madeleine Hinkes. A report prepared by Hinkes describes the presence 
of five unauthorized excavation pits at this site. The human remains 
were collected from these pits or elsewhere downslope. There is no 
record in Arizona State Museum files regarding the accession of these 
human remains. However, the collection likely entered the museum in the 
same year as other collections from the summer field school. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    The Pinnacle Site contains a pueblo of about 10 rooms. It is dated 
to the period from A.D. 1275 to 1400 on the basis of the ceramic 
assemblage. The ceramic and architectural forms are consistent with the 
archeologically described Upland Mogollon or prehistoric Western Pueblo 
traditions.
    In 1978, legally authorized excavations were conducted at site AZ 
P:14:176(ASM), Navajo County, AZ, by the University of Arizona 
Archaeological Field School under the direction of Brian Byrd. No human 
burials were intentionally excavated during this project. Archeological 
collections from the site were brought to the museum at the end of each 
field season, but no accession number was assigned. In 2009 and 2010, 
Arizona State Museum staff found fragmentary human remains representing 
a minimum of two individuals intermingled with animal bone collections 
from this site. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    Site AZ P:14:176 is a small pithouse site located in the vicinity 
of Chiwodist[aacute]s. Based on the ceramic assemblage and 
architectural forms, the site has been dated to the early Mogollon 
period, approximately A.D. 500 to 1000. These characteristics are 
consistent with the archeologically described Upland Mogollon or 
prehistoric Western Pueblo traditions.
    In 1979, fragmentary human remains representing a minimum of 74 
individuals were removed from an unnamed site, AZ P:14:281(ASM), Navajo 
County, AZ, during a legally authorized survey conducted by the 
University of Arizona Archaeological Field School under the direction 
of Madeleine Hinkes. A report prepared by Hinkes describes the presence 
of at least 70 unauthorized excavation pits at this site. The human 
remains were collected from these pits or adjacent backdirt piles. 
There is no record in Arizona State Museum files regarding the 
accession of these human remains. However, the collection likely 
entered the museum in the same year as other collections from the 
summer field school. No known individuals were identified. The three 
associated funerary objects are two modified animal bones and one bone 
bead.
    Site AZ P:14:281 contains a pueblo of about 31 rooms with 
additional stone alignments. Based on the ceramic assemblage, the site 
is dated to the period from A.D. 1275 to 1400. The ceramic and the 
architectural forms are consistent with the archeologically described 
Upland Mogollon or prehistoric Western Pueblo traditions.
    In 1929, human remains representing six individuals were removed 
from Canyon Creek Ruin, AZ C:2:8(GP)/AZ V:2:1(ASM), Gila County, AZ, 
during legally authorized excavations conducted by the Gila Pueblo 
Foundation, under the direction of Emil Haury. In 1950, the Gila Pueblo 
Foundation closed and the collections were transferred to the Arizona 
State Museum. No known individuals were identified. The 69 associated 
funerary objects are 1 basketry artifact, 9 pieces of botanical 
material, 1 piece of cotton roving, 2 cradleboards, 1 gourd bottle, 1 
gourd dipper, 2 gourd scoops, 1 hair bundle, 3 ceramic bowls, 1 cotton 
manta, 1 basketry bowl, 1 basketry mat, 7 basketry mat fragments, 1 
basketry tump strap, 1 reed-grass bundle, 2 sandals, 1 wood spindle, 2 
cotton spindle sticks, 27 textile fragments, 1 torch, 1 yucca fiber 
apron, 1 yucca fiber quid, and 1 lot of yucca fiber yarn.
    In 1979, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were removed from Canyon Creek Ruin, AZ C:2:8(GP)/AZ V:2:1(ASM), Gila 
County, AZ, during a legally authorized survey conducted by the 
University of Arizona Archaeological Field School under the direction 
of Madeleine Hinkes. The purpose of this project was to survey 
vandalism at Canyon Creek Ruin and other sites in the vicinity and to 
recover human remains that had been disturbed by unauthorized 
excavations. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.

[[Page 14066]]

    Canyon Creek Ruin is a cliff dwelling site of approximately 140 
rooms. Based on ceramic and perishable artifact assemblage, the site is 
dated to A.D. 1300 to 1400. The ceramic and the architectural forms are 
consistent with the archeologically described Upland Mogollon or 
prehistoric Western Pueblo traditions.
    In 1980, a collection survey was conducted at the Hole Canyon Ruin 
Site, AZ V:2:5(ASM), in Gila County, AZ, under the auspices of the 
University of Arizona Archaeological Field School under the direction 
of David Tuggle. No human burials were intentionally excavated during 
this project. Archeological collections from the site were brought to 
the museum at the end of each field season, but no accession number was 
assigned. In 2007, Arizona State Museum staff found fragmentary human 
remains representing a minimum of one individual intermingled with the 
perishable items collections from this site. No known individual was 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Hole Canyon Ruin is a cliff dwelling with approximately 19 rooms. 
Based on the ceramic assemblage, the site may be dated to the period 
A.D. 1300 to 1400. The ceramic and the architectural forms are 
consistent with the archeologically described Upland Mogollon or 
prehistoric Western Pueblo traditions.
    In 1969, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals 
were removed from site AZ V:2:12(ASM), Gila County, AZ, during legally 
authorized salvage activities conducted by the University of Arizona 
Archaeological Field School under the direction of David Tuggle. The 
site had previously been extensively vandalized, and the objective of 
the University of Arizona archeologists was to recover human remains 
that had been disturbed. Archeological collections from the site were 
brought to the museum at the end of each field season, but no accession 
number was assigned. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    Site AZ V:2:12 consists of a small pueblo of about 10 to 20 rooms 
and is associated with late Puebloan ceramics. On this basis, the site 
may be dated to A.D. 1275 to 1400. These characteristics are consistent 
with the archeologically described Upland Mogollon or prehistoric 
Western Pueblo traditions.
    A detailed discussion of the basis for cultural affiliation of 
archeological sites in the region where the above sites are located may 
be found in ``Cultural Affiliation Assessment of White Mountain Apache 
Tribal Lands (Fort Apache Indian Reservation)'', by John R. Welch and 
T.J. Ferguson (2005). To summarize, archeologists have used the terms 
Upland Mogollon or prehistoric Western Pueblo to define the 
archeological complexes represented by the 10 sites listed above. 
Material culture characteristics of these traditions include a temporal 
progression from earlier pit houses to later masonry pueblos, villages 
organized in room blocks of contiguous dwellings associated with 
plazas, rectangular kivas, polished and paint-decorated ceramics, 
unpainted corrugated ceramics, inhumation burials, cradleboard cranial 
deformation, grooved stone axes, and bone artifacts. The combination of 
the material culture attributes and a subsistence pattern, which 
included hunting and gathering augmented by maize agriculture, helps to 
identify an earlier group. Archeologists have also remarked that there 
are strong similarities between this earlier group and present-day 
tribes included in the Western Pueblo ethnographic group, especially 
the Hopi Tribe of Arizona and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, 
New Mexico. The similarities in ceramic traditions, burial practices, 
architectural forms, and settlement patterns have led archeologists to 
believe that the prehistoric inhabitants of the Mogollon Rim region 
migrated north and west to the Hopi mesas, and north and east to the 
Zuni River Valley. Certain objects found in Upland Mogollon 
archeological sites have been found to have strong resemblances to 
ritual paraphernalia that are used in continuing religious practices by 
the Hopi and Zuni. Some petroglyphs on the Fort Apache Indian 
Reservation have also persuaded archeologists of continuities between 
the earlier identified group and current-day Western Pueblo people. 
Biological information from the site of Grasshopper Pueblo, which is 
located in close proximity to the ten sites listed above, supports the 
view that the prehistoric occupants of the Upland Mogollon region had 
migrated from various locations to the north and west of the region.
    Hopi and Zuni oral traditions parallel the archeological evidence 
for migration. Migration figures prominently in Hopi oral tradition, 
which refers to the ancient sites, pottery, stone tools, petroglyphs, 
and other artifacts left behind by the ancestors as ``Hopi 
Footprints.'' This migration history is complex and detailed, and 
includes traditions relating specific clans to the Mogollon region. 
Hopi cultural advisors have also identified medicinal and culinary 
plants at archeological sites in the region. Their knowledge about 
these plants was passed down to them from the ancestors who inhabited 
these ancient sites. Migration is also an important attribute of Zuni 
oral tradition, and includes accounts of Zuni ancestors passing through 
the Upland Mogollon region. The ancient villages mark the routes of 
these migrations. Zuni cultural advisors remark that the ancient sites 
were not abandoned. People returned to these places from time to time, 
either to reoccupy them or for the purpose of religious pilgrimages--a 
practice that has continued to the present-day. Archeologists have 
found ceramic evidence at shrines in the Upland Mogollon region that 
confirms these reports. Zuni cultural advisors have names for plants 
endemic to the Mogollon region that do not grow on the Zuni 
Reservation. They also have knowledge about traditional medicinal and 
ceremonial uses for these resources, which has been passed down to them 
from their ancestors. Furthermore, Hopi and Zuni cultural advisors have 
recognized that their ancestors may have been co-resident at some of 
the sites in this region during their ancestral migrations.
    There are differing points of view regarding the possible presence 
of Apache people in the Upland Mogollon region during the time that 
these ancient sites were occupied. Some Apache traditions describe 
interactions with Ancestral Puebloan people during this time, but 
according to these stories, Puebloan people and Apache people were 
regarded as having separate identities. The White Mountain Apache Tribe 
of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona, does not claim cultural 
affiliation with the human remains and associated funerary objects from 
these 10 ancestral Upland Mogollon sites. As reported by Welch and 
Ferguson (2005), consultations between the White Mountain Apache Tribe 
of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona, and the Navajo Nation, 
Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; and Pueblo of 
Laguna, New Mexico, have indicated that none of these tribes wish to 
pursue claims of affiliation with sites on White Mountain Apache Tribal 
lands. Finally, the White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache 
Reservation, Arizona, supports the repatriation of human remains and 
associated funerary objects from these 10 ancestral Upland Mogollon 
sites and is ready to assist the Hopi Tribe of Arizona and Zuni Tribe 
of the Zuni

[[Page 14067]]

Reservation, New Mexico, in their reburial on tribal land.
    Officials of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Arizona State Museum 
have determined, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), that the human remains 
described above represent the physical remains of 241 individuals of 
Native American ancestry. Officials of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and 
Arizona State Museum also have determined, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 
3001(3)(A), that the 74 objects described above are reasonably believed 
to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time 
of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, 
officials of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Arizona State Museum have 
determined, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), that there is a relationship 
of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the 
Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the 
Hopi Tribe of Arizona and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New 
Mexico.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact John McClelland, NAGPRA Coordinator, Arizona 
State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, telephone (520) 
626-2950, before April 14, 2011. Repatriation of the human remains and 
associated funerary objects to the Hopi Tribe of Arizona and Zuni Tribe 
of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico, may proceed after that date if no 
additional claimants come forward.
    The Arizona State Museum is responsible for notifying The Tribes 
that this notice has been published.

    Dated: March 9, 2011.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2011-5888 Filed 3-14-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P




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