FR Doc E6-13586
[Federal Register: August 17, 2006 (Volume 71, Number 159)]
[Notices]               
[Page 47517]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr17au06-76]                         

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington 
State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains in the control of the 
Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), 
University of Washington, Seattle, WA. The human remains were removed 
from along the Columbia River in Chelan County, WA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Burke Museum 
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the 
Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington.
    In 1966, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals 
were removed from 45-CH-201 along the Columbia River in Chelan County, 
WA. The human remains were collected under the direction of Brain 
Holmes as part of a field party of the University of Washington led by 
R.S. Kidd for the State of Washington Highway Survey Project. The human 
remains were accessioned by the Burke Museum in 1966 (Burke Accn. 1966-
76). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present. Stone debitage was noted on the site inventory 
form, but its whereabouts are unknown.
    Based on archeological evidence, the human remains have been 
determined to be Native American. The skeletal morphology was 
indeterminate. Geographic affiliation is consistent with the 
historically documented territory of the Confederated Tribes of the 
Colville Reservation, Washington. The southern area of Lake Chelan was 
part of the aboriginal territory of the Chelan people. The Chelan spoke 
a Wenatchee dialect of the Interior Salish language. This area was 
incorporated into part of the Moses-Columbia Reservation in 1879. 
Descendants of the Chelan and Moses Columbia are members of the 
Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington.
    Officials of the Burke Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 
U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described above represent the 
physical remains of three individuals of Native American ancestry. 
Officials of the Burke Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 
U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that 
can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and 
the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. 
Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 353010, 
Seattle, WA 98195-3010, telephone (206) 685-2282, before September 18, 
2006. Repatriation of the human remains to the Confederated Tribes of 
the Colville Reservation, Washington may proceed after that date if no 
additional claimants come forward.
    The Burke Museum is responsible for notifying the Confederated 
Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington that this notice has 
been published.

    Dated: July 24, 2006
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E6-13586 Filed 8-16-06; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 4312-50-S

Back to the top