[Federal Register: September 12, 2002 (Volume 67, Number 177)]
[Notices]               
[Page 57843-57844]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr12se02-104]                         

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service
 
Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains 
and Associated Funerary Objects in the Possession of Pomona College, 
Claremont, CA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native 
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9, 
of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated 
funerary objects in the possession of Pomona College, Claremont, CA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 43 CFR 10.2 (c). The 
determinations within this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of these Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations within this 
notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Pomona 
College Museum staff and a NAGPRA consultant in consultation with 
representatives of the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak 
Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Cocopah Tribe of Arizona; Colorado 
River Indian Tribes of the Colorado River Indian Reservation, Arizona 
and California; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian 
Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa 
Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O'odham 
Nation of Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were 
recovered from the Laveen site, Section 34, Maricopa County, AZ, by an 
unknown person. In 1951, Dr. E.H. Parker donated the remains to Pomona 
College. There is no information indicating how Dr. Parker acquired the 
remains. No known individual was identified. The one associated 
funerary object is a red-on-buff pottery jar, which held the cremated 
remains. The pottery jar dates to the Santa Cruz phase (A.D. 700-900) 
of the Hohokam culture of Arizona.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were 
removed from Casa Grande, Pinal

[[Page 57844]]

County, AZ, by an unknown person. In 1951, Dr. E.H. Parker donated the 
remains to Pomona College. There is no information indicating how Dr. 
Parker acquired the remains. No known individual was identified. The 
one associated funerary object is a Gila Red pottery jar, which held 
the cremated remains. The pottery jar dates to the Soho phase (A.D. 
1150-1300) of the Hohokam culture of Arizona.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were 
removed from an unknown location in central Arizona by an unknown 
person. In 1951, Dr. E.H. Parker donated the remains to Pomona College. 
There is no information indicating how Dr. Parker acquired the remains. 
No known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object 
is a red-on-buff pottery jar, which held the cremated remains. The 
pottery jar dates to the Santa Cruz phase (A.D. 700-900), Colonial 
period, of the Hohokam culture of Arizona.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were 
recovered from the Tonto Basin, Gila County, AZ, by an unknown person. 
In 1951, Dr. E.H. Parker donated the remains to Pomona College. There 
is no information indicating how Dr. Parker acquired the remains. No 
known individual was identified. The four associated funerary objects 
are shell rings, which are dated to the Colonial-Classic period (A.D. 
550-1450) of Hohokam culture.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were 
recovered from Gila Bend, Maricopa County, AZ, by an unknown person. In 
1951, Dr. E.H. Parker donated the remains to Pomona College. There is 
no information indicating how Dr. Parker acquired the remains. No known 
individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is a 
salt-smudged, red pottery jar, which held the cremated remains. The 
pottery jar dates to the Civano phase (A.D. 1300-1450) of the Hohokam 
culture of Arizona.
    In their book, Those Who Came Before: Southwestern Archeology in 
the National Park System (University of Arizona Press, 1983), Robert H. 
and Florence C. Lister describe the practices and accomplishments of 
the Hohokam Indians. Cremation was a common mortuary practice of the 
Hohokam. Ashes, unconsumed pieces of bone, and the damaged or destroyed 
funerary offerings of pottery or stone were buried in pits or trenches. 
The Hohokam are credited with creating simple tools, utilitarian 
objects, religious, and ornamental objects made from shell obtained 
through trade from the Gulf of California and the Pacific Coast.
    These ethnographic materials and technology adaptations indicate 
affiliation to the historic and present-day Piman and O'odham cultures. 
Historic O'odham groups (Ak-Chin Indian Community of the Ak-Chin Indian 
Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River 
Indian Reservation, Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community 
of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and the Tohono O'odham Nation 
of Arizona) have a strong cultural affiliation with the prehistoric 
Hohokam who occupied the middle Gila Valley and surrounding areas. 
Similarities in settlement patterns, economic systems, architecture, 
and material culture indicate a close relationship between the Hohokam 
and O'odham groups.
    The Cocopah Tribe of Arizona also claims affiliation with the 
Hohokam, according to the Southwest Indian Relief Council Web site. 
About 3,000 Cocopah lived in the Southwest in the late 1600s. Like the 
Hohokam, the Cocopah became successful at irrigated farming.
    The oral traditions of the Hopi Tribe and the Pueblo of Zuni 
provide evidence that the Hopi and Zuni are culturally affiliated with 
the Hohokam. The human remains and associated funerary objects were 
removed from an area historically occupied by these tribes.
    Based on the above-mentioned information, officials of the Pomona 
College Museum of Art have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 
(d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the physical remains 
of five individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of Pomona 
College Museum of Art, also have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 
10.2 (d)(2), the eight objects listed above are reasonably believed to 
have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of 
death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials 
of the Pomona College Museum of Art, have determined that, pursuant to 
43 CFR 10.2 (e), there is a relationship of shared group identity that 
can be reasonably traced between these Native American human remains 
and associated funerary objects and the Ak Chin Indian Community of the 
Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Cocopah Tribe of 
Arizona; Colorado River Indian Tribes of the Colorado River Indian 
Reservation, Arizona and California; Gila River Indian Community of the 
Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt 
River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, 
Arizona; Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni 
Reservation, New Mexico.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Ak Chin Indian 
Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; 
Cocopah Tribe of Arizona; Colorado River Indian Tribes of the Colorado 
River Indian Reservation, Arizona and California; Gila River Indian 
Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of 
Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River 
Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona; and Zuni Tribe 
of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Representatives of any other 
Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with 
these human remains and associated funerary objects should contact 
Marjorie L. Harth, Director, Pomona College Museum of Art, 333 College 
Way, Claremont, CA 91711-6344, telephone (909) 607-2688, before October 
15, 2002. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects to the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) 
Indian Reservation, Arizona; Cocopah Tribe of Arizona; Colorado River 
Indian Tribes of the Colorado River Indian Reservation, Arizona and 
California; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian 
Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa 
Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O'odham 
Nation of Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico 
may begin after that date if no additional claimants come forward.

    Dated: July 18, 2002
C. Timothy McKeown,
Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program
[FR Doc. 02-23126 Filed 9-11-02; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-S



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