[Federal Register: October 5, 2001 (Volume 66, Number 194)]
[Notices]
[Page 51062-51064]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr05oc01-122]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects in the Possession of the Peabody Museum
of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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[[Page 51063]]

    Notice is hereby given in accordance with the provisions of the
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 42 CFR
10.9, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated
funerary objects in the possession of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology
and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 43 CFR 10.2 (c). The
determinations within this notice are the sole responsibility of the
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of these Native
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations within this
notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary
objects was made by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Cayuga
Nation of New York; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of
Indians, Oklahoma; Oneida Nation of New York; Oneida Tribe of
Wisconsin; Onondaga Nation of New York; St. Regis Band of Mohawk
Indians of New York; Seneca Nation of New York; Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of
Oklahoma; Stockbridge-Munsee Community of Mohican Indians of Wisconsin;
Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York; Tuscarora Nation of New
York; and the nonfederally recognized Mohawk Nation Council of Chiefs.
    In 1906, human remains representing 41 individuals were recovered
from Heath Farm, in Rodman, NY, during a Peabody Museum expedition led
by M.R. Harrington and I. Hayden. No known individuals were identified.
The six associated funerary objects are unfinished celts, bone awls,
yellow ochre, and animal bones.
    Museum documentation indicates that the Heath Farm site is on the
western border of the township of Rodman, approximately 1.5 miles west
of the village of Rodman, along the northern bank of the North Sandy
Creek. Interments from this site most likely date to the Late Woodland
period (A.D. 1000-1600). Artifacts recovered from the site, but not
associated with the burials, support this date. These objects include
Levanna- and Madison-style projectile points, ceramic vessels with
globular bodies, constricted, zoned incised necks, and castellated
rims, and a variety of terra cotta pipes, including pipes with trumpet-
shaped bowls and bowls with representations of human faces and animals.
    In 1906, human remains representing 14 individuals were recovered
from Durfee Farm, in Ellisburg, NY, during a Peabody Museum expedition
led by M.R. Harrington and I. Hayden. No known individuals were
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Museum documentation indicates that the Durfee Farm site is in the
township of Ellisburg, 3 miles north-northwest of the village of
Pierrepont Manor, between Taylor Brook and Spring Brook, in the
vicinity of a scattered group of farmhouses that were known locally as
the ``Taylor settlement.'' The site lies on a low, flat-topped hill
historically known as the ``Old Fort lot,'' once belonging to the old
Durfee farm. Interments from this site most likely date to the Late
Woodland period (A.D. 1000-1600). Artifacts recovered from the site,
but not associated with the burials, support this date. These objects
include Levanna- and Madison-style projectile points, ceramic vessels
with globular bodies, constricted, zoned incised necks, and castellated
rims, and a variety of terra cotta pipes, including pipes with trumpet-
shaped bowls and bowls with representations of human faces and animals.
    In 1906, human remains representing three individuals were
recovered from the Perch River Bay site, in Brownville, NY, during a
Peabody Museum expedition led by M.R. Harrington and I. Hayden. No
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    Museum documentation indicates that the Perch River Bay site is
located along the shore of Lake Ontario, at the head of Perch River Bay
(now known as Black River Bay), in the township of Brownville,
southwest of the village of Limerick, on what was then the farm of
Julius Maynard. Interments from this site most likely date to the Late
Woodland period (A.D. 1000-1600). Artifacts recovered from the site,
but not associated with the burials, support this date. These objects
include Levanna- and Madison-style projectile points, ceramic vessels
with globular bodies, constricted, zoned incised necks, and castellated
rims, and a variety of terra cotta pipes, including pipes with trumpet-
shaped bowls and bowls with representations of human faces and animals.
    Excavation and museum records clearly indicate that these human
remains and associated funerary objects were removed from specific
burials of Native American individuals. Based on the archeological
materials from the sites, museum documentation, and oral histories
presented by the Oneida Nation of New York and Oneida Tribe of
Wisconsin, and the provenience of human remains and associated funerary
objects from areas considered to be aboriginal homelands and
traditional burial areas of the Oneida Nation of New York and Oneida
Tribe of Wisconsin, a reasonable link of shared group identity may be
made to the Oneida Nation of New York and Oneida Tribe of Wisconsin.
    Based on the above-mentioned information, officials of the Peabody
Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology have determined that, pursuant to
43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the
physical remains of 58 individuals of Native American ancestry.
Officials of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology also have
determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(2), the six associated
funerary objects described above are reasonably believed to have been
placed with or near individual human remains at the times of death or
later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials at the
Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology have determined that,
pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (e), there is a relationship of shared group
identity that can be reasonably traced between these Native American
human remains and associated funerary objects and the Oneida Nation of
New York and the Oneida Tribe of Wisconsin.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Cayuga Nation of New
York; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma;
Oneida Nation of New York; Oneida Tribe of Wisconsin; Onondaga Nation
of New York; St. Regis Band of Mohawk Indians of New York; Seneca
Nation of New York; Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma; Stockbridge-Munsee
Community of Mohican Indians of Wisconsin; Tonawanda Band of Seneca
Indians of New York; Tuscarora Nation of New York; and the nonfederally
recognized Mohawk Nation Council of Chiefs. Representatives of any
other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated
with these objects should contact Patricia Capone, Repatriation
Coordinator, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard
University, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, telephone (617)
496-3702, before November 5, 2001. Repatriation of these human remains
and associated funerary objects to the Oneida Nation of New York and
the Oneida Tribe of Wisconsin may begin after that date if no
additional claimants come forward.

[[Page 51064]]

    Dated: July 3, 2001.
John Robbins,
Assistant Director, Cultural Resources Stewardship and Partnerships.
[FR Doc. 01-24964 Filed 10-4-01; 8:45 am]
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