[Federal Register: August 26, 1999 (Volume 64, Number 165)]
[Notices]
[Page 46719]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr26au99-119]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects in the Possession of the University
Museum, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR

AGENCY: National Park Service, DOI.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9,
of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated
funerary objects in the possession of the University Museum, University
of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by University
Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the
Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; and the Tunica-Biloxi Indian Tribe
of Louisiana.
    In 1932, human remains representing a minimum of 19 individuals
were recovered from the Kinkead-Mainard site (3PU2), Pulaski County, AR
during excavations conducted by the University Museum. No known
individuals were identified. The 117 associated funerary objects
include ceramic vessels, ceramic sherds, a clay ball, lithic debris,
copper beads, a copper band, a copper nugget, pigment, animal bones, a
tortoise carapace, an antler pendant, antler projectile points, bone
awls, shell beads, a mussel shell, and leather fragments.
    Based on the associated funerary objects, and skeletal and dental
morphology, these human remains have been identified as Native
American. Based on ceramic styles and construction, this site has been
identified as a manifestation of the Menard Complex during the
protohistoric period (1500-1700 AD). French historical documents from
1700 indicate only the Quapaw tribe had villages in the area of the
Kinkead-Mainard site. In 1818, the Quapaw ceded the central Arkansas
River valley, including the Kinkead-Mainard site, to the United States.
Based on historical information and continuity of occupation, these
human remains have been affiliated with the Quapaw Tribe of Indians,
Oklahoma.
    In 1965, human remains representing eight individuals were
recovered from the Parkin site (3CS29), Cross County, AR during the
Arkansas Archeological Society summer excavation under the direction of
the University Museum. No known individuals were identified. The eight
associated funerary objects include ceramic vessels, potsherds, and a
pottery object.
    In 1966, human remains representing 17 individuals were recovered
from the Parkin site (3CS29), Cross County, AR during the University of
Arkansas Archeological Field School. No known individuals were
identified. The 21 associated funerary objects include pottery vessels,
potsherds, animal bones, and stones.
    Based on the associated funerary objects, and skeletal and dental
morphology, these human remains have been identified as Native
American. Based on historical documents, Spanish artifacts at the site,
and archeological research, the Parkin site is thought to be the
village of Casqui from the DeSoto era (c. 1541-3 AD). Based on
radiocarbon dates and Native ceramics, the Parkin site has been dated
to the late Mississippian to the early protohistoric period (1350-1600
AD). French historical documents from 1700 indicate only the Quapaw
tribe had villages in the area of eastern Arkansas above the mouth of
the Arkansas River. Based on historical information, oral tradition,
and continuity of occupation, these human remains have been affiliated
with the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the
University Museum, University of Arkansas have determined that,
pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the human remains listed above
represent the physical remains of 44 individuals of Native American
ancestry. Officials of the University Museum, University of Arkansas
have also determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(2), the 146
objects listed above are reasonably believed to have been placed with
or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part
of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the University
Museum, University of Arkansas have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR
10.2 (e), there is a relationship of shared group identity which can be
reasonably traced between these Native American human remains and
associated funerary objects and the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Quapaw Tribe of
Indians, Oklahoma; and the Tunica-Biloxi Indian Tribe of Louisiana.
Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be
culturally affiliated with these human remains and associated funerary
objects should contact Michael P. Hoffman, Curator of Anthropology,
University Museum, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72702;
telephone: (501) 575-3855, before September 27, 1999. Repatriation of
the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Quapaw Tribe
of Indians, Oklahoma may begin after that date if no additional
claimants come forward.
Dated: August 5, 1999.
Francis P. McManamon,
Departmental Consulting Archeologist,
Manager, Archeology and Ethnography Program.
[FR Doc. 99-22163 Filed 8-25-99; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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