[Federal Register: July 23, 1999 (Volume 64, Number 141)]
[Notices]
[Page 40039-40040]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr23jy99-126]

[[Page 40039]]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects in the Possession of the Minnesota
Indian Affairs Council, St. Paul and Bemidji, MN

AGENCY: National Park Service

ACTION: Notice

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9,
of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated
funerary objects in the possession of the Minnesota Indian Affairs
Council, St. Paul and Bemidji, MN.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Minnesota
Indian Affairs Council professional staff in consultation with
representatives of the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, the Iowa
Tribe of Oklahoma, and the Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma.
    In 1979, human remains representing three individuals were
collected from site 21-HU-26, Houston County, MN during an
archeological survey conducted by Tom Trow of the Minnesota Historical
Society. In 1987, two of these individuals were turned over to the
Minnesota Indian Affairs Council. In 1993, the third individual was
turned over to the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council. No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    Based on archeological surveys, ethnohistoric evidence, material
culture, and types of associated funerary objects, site 21-HU-26 has
been identified as an Oneota/Orr phase Mississippian site. Based on
continuities of material culture, historical documents, and oral
history, the Oneota/Orr phase of the Mississippian archeological
culture has been determined to be ancestral to the present-day Ioway
tribes.
    In 1935, human remains representing seven individuals were removed
from site 21-FL-09, Rushford Mound site, Fillmore County, near
Rushford, MN during an archeological excavation conducted by A.E. Jenks
of the University of Minnesota. After 1987, these human remains were
turned over to the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council. No known
individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects are
two mortuary ceramic vessels.
    Based on archeological surveys, material culture, and types of
associated funerary objects, site 21-FL-09 has been identified as an
Oneota/Orr phase Mississippian site. Based on continuities of material
culture, historical documents, and oral history, the Oneota/Orr phase
of the Mississippian archeological culture has been determined to be
ancestral to the present-day Ioway tribes.
    In 1942, human remains representing 12 individuals were removed
from site 21-HU-04, Wilsey site, Houston County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University
of Minnesota. At a later date, these human remains were turned over to
the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council. No known individuals were
identified. The five associated funerary objects include flint chips, a
catlinite pipe, an end scraper, a pottery vessel, and a notched
arrowhead.
    In 1947, human remains representing 16 individuals were recovered
from site 21-HU-04, Wilsey site, Houston County, MN during further
archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University
of Minnesota. At a later date, these human remains were turned over to
the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council. No known individuals were
identified. The six associated funerary objects include flint flakes, a
quartzite knife, tip of a flint knife, a pottery vessel, copper beads
with leather, and a copper bead.
    Based on archeological surveys, material culture, and types of
associated funerary objects, site 21-HU-04 has been identified as an
Oneota/Orr phase Mississippian site. Based on continuities of material
culture, historical documents, and oral history, the Oneota/Orr phase
of the Mississippian archeological culture has been determined to be
ancestral to the present-day Ioway tribes.
    In 1942 and 1947, human remains representing three individuals were
removed from 21-HU-01, Hogback site, Houston County, MN during salvage
and archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the
University of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The six
associated funerary objects include flint chips, one ceramic sherd, one
copper bead, a projectile point, a pottery vessel, and a catlinite
pipe.
    In 1953, human remains representing 52 individuals were removed
from site 21-HU-01, Hogback site, Houston County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University
of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The 22 associated
funerary objects include bark/leather fragments, two polished bird
metapodials, mortuary vessels, a bone fish hook, shell and copper
beads, a catlinite pipe, spiral copper beads, shell and bark/fabric,
spiral copper beads and a large clamshell, a necklace of copper, shell,
and glass beads, a necklace of copper beads and springs, an end
scraper, a grooved axe, a triangular projectile point, a bear claw
necklace with copper spring and shell beads, a bone awl, a flint knife,
copper bead and beaver teeth, worked bone with drilled holes, and a
clamshell.
    Based on archeological surveys, material culture, and types of
associated funerary objects, site 21-HU-01 has been identified as an
Oneota/Orr phase Mississippian site. Based on continuities of material
culture, historical documents, and oral history, the Oneota/Orr phase
of the Mississippian archeological culture has been determined to be
ancestral to the present-day Ioway tribes.
    In 1948, human remains representing one individual were removed
from site 21-FL-08, Riehl Mound site, Fillmore County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University
of Minnesota. No known individual was identified. The three associated
funerary objects include a base of a biface, a crescent chert knife,
and a projectile point.
    Based on archeological surveys, material culture, and types of
associated funerary objects, site 21-FL-08 has been identified as an
Oneota/Orr phase Mississippian site. Based on continuities of material
culture, historical documents, and oral history, the Oneota/Orr phase
of the Mississippian archeological culture has been determined to be
ancestral to the present-day Ioway tribes.
    In 1954, human remains representing two individuals were removed
from site 21-GD-04, Bryan site, Goodhue County, MN during archeological
excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University of Minnesota.
In 1991, these human remains were transferred to the Minnesota Indian
Affairs Council. No known individuals were identified. No associated
funerary objects are present.
    In 1984, human remains representing three individuals were removed
from site 21-GD-04, the Bryan site, Goodhue County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by Clark Dobbs of the Institute for
Minnesota Archaeology and the University of Minnesota. In 1994, these
human remains were transferred to the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council.
No known individuals were identified. The eight associated funerary
objects include ceramice sherds, burned bone, charcoal, rock, ochre,
shell, a lithic flake and a possible hammerstone.

[[Page 40040]]

    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were
removed from site 21-GD-04, the Bryan site, Goodhue County, MN by an
unknown person who donated the remains to the University of Minnesota.
No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    During 1970-1971, human remains representing one individual were
removed from site 21-GD-04, the Bryan site, Goodhue County, MN by David
Nystuen of the Minnesota Historical Society. In 1987, these human
remains were transferred to the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council. No
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were
removed from site 21-GD-04, the Bryan site, Goodhue County, MN by Heinz
Weisse. In 1979, these human remains were donated to the Minnesota
Historical Society by Tom Igwn. In 1987, these human remains were
transferred to the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council. No known
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1952, human remains representing four individuals were removed
from site 21-GD-04, the Bryan site, Goodhue County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University
of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The three
associated funerary objects are an animal bone, a scapula hoe, and clam
shells.
    In 1955, human remains representing three individuals were removed
from site 21-GD-04, the Bryan site, Goodhue County, MN during
archeological investigations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the
University of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. No
associated funerary objects were present.
    During the 1950s, human remains representing four individuals were
removed from site FL-8, Riehl Mounds, Fillmore County, MN by person(s)
unknown. In 1992, these human remains were turned over to J. Oothoudt
who turned them over to the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council. No known
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Based on archeological surveys, material culture, and types of
associated funerary objects, site 21-GD-04 has been identified as
Mississippian, Oneota/Blue Earth and Silvernale phases. Based on
continuities of material culture, historical documents, and oral
history, the Oneota/Blue Earth phase of the Mississippian archeological
culture has been determined to be ancestral to the present-day Otoe.
Based on continuities of material culture, historical documents, and
oral history, the Silvernale phase of the Mississippian archeological
culture has been determined to be ancestral to the present-day Ioway.
    In 1950, human remains representing one individual were removed
from site 21-GD-05, Eggleston Mound Group site, Goodhue County, MN
during archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the
University of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The two
associated funerary objects are a lithic flake/scraper, and clam
shells.
    Based on archeological surveys, material culture, and types of
associated funerary objects, site 21-GD-05 has been identified as
Mississippian, Oneota phase. Based on continuities of material culture,
historical documents, and oral history, the Oneota phase of the
Mississippian archeological culture has been determined to be ancestral
to the present-day Otoe and Ioway.
    In 1955, human remains representing two individuals were removed
from site 21-SB-01, High Island Mound site/Black Tortoise Mound, Sibley
County, MN during archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford
of the University of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified.
No associated funerary objects were present.
    Based on archeological surveys, material culture, and types of
associated funerary objects, site 21-SB-01 has been identified as
Mississippian, Oneota phase. Based on continuities of material culture,
historical documents, and oral history, the Oneota phase of the
Mississippian archeological culture has been determined to be ancestral
to the present-day Otoe and Ioway.
    In 1952, human remains representing three individuals were removed
from site 21-WL-02, McCauleyville Mound site, Wilkin County, MN during
excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University of Minnesota.
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects
were present.
    Based on archeological surveys, material culture, and types of
associated funerary objects, site 21-WL-02 has been identified as
Mississippian, Oneota phase. Based on continuities of material culture,
historical documents, and oral history, the Oneota phase of the
Mississippian archeological culture has been determined to be ancestral
to the present-day Otoe and Ioway.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the
Minnesota Indian Affairs Council have determined that, pursuant to 43
CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the physical
remains of 117 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of
the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council have also determined that,
pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(2), the 57 objects listed above are
reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human
remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or
ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council
have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (e), there is a
relationship of shared group identity which can be reasonably traced
between these Native American human remains and associated funerary
objects and the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, the Iowa Tribe of
Oklahoma, and the Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Iowa Tribe of Kansas
and Nebraska, the Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, and the Otoe-Missouria Tribe
of Indians, Oklahoma. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that
believes itself to be culturally affiliated with these human remains
and associated funerary objects should contact Mr. James L. (Jim)
Jones, Cultural Resource Specialist, Minnesota Indian Affairs Council,
1819 Bemidji Ave. Bemidji, MN 56601; telephone: (218) 755-3825, before
August 23, 1999. Repatriation of the human remains and associated
funerary objects to the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, the Iowa
Tribe of Oklahoma, and the Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma
may begin after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
Dated: July 16, 1999.
Francis P. McManamon,
Departmental Consulting Archeologist,
Manager, Archeology and Ethnography Program.
[FR Doc. 99-18890 Filed 7-22-99; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

Back to the top

Back to National-NAGPRA