[Federal Register: December 17, 1998 (Volume 63, Number 242)]
[Notices]
[Page 69649-69650]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr17de98-94]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains,
Associated Funerary Objects, and Unassociated Funerary Objects from
Wisconsin in the Possession of the Neville Public Museum of Brown
County, Green Bay, WI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior

ACTION: Notice

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9,
of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated
funerary objects from Wisconsin in the possession of the Neville Public
Museum of Brown County, Green Bay, WI.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Neville
Public Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives
of the Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska,
and the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin.
    In 1940, human remains representing five individuals were recovered
from Allouez, WI during road construction on the corner of S. Jackson
and Derby Lane. Between 1940 and 1941, these human remains were donated
to the Neville

[[Page 69650]]

Public Museum by Alex Gauthier and W.C. McClendon. No known individuals
were identified. The seven associated funerary objects include one iron
sickle blade, one iron 10-d nail section, one iron spike, two pieces of
burned sandstone, and two non-human large mammal bones.
    Based on the associated funerary objects and the apparent age of
the burials, these individuals have been identified as Native American
from the Late Historic period. During the Late Historic period, the
area of Allouez, WI was occupied primarily by the Menominee Indian
Tribe.
    In 1941, human remains representing 22 individuals were recovered
from the Gibson Rock Shelter, Brown County, WI by R.L. Hall, W. Wittry,
and A. Linck. No accession records exist for these human remains, but
they are believed to have been donated by R.L. Hall, W. Wittry, and A.
Linck. No known individual were identified. The minimum of 16
associated funerary objects include one antler point, one beveled bone
knife, a shell bead, turtle plastron ``plaque'', non-human bones, one
beaver incisor, one snail shell, one stick, and grit-tempered sherds,
some of which form two Aztalan Collared vessels.
    Based on the associated funerary objects and apparent age of the
burials, these individuals have been determined to be Native American.
Based on the ceramic types, these burials are estimated to date to the
Woodland period. Based on continuities of ceramics and occupation, some
archeologists believe the ceramics are associated with ancestors of the
Menominee. Although other archeologists believe the ceramics could be
associated with the Ho-Chunk, the museum feels the evidence indicates a
primarily Menominee cultural affiliation.
    In 1950, human remains representing 12 individuals were recovered
from the Charles Grignon House, operated by the Outagamie County
Historical Society, Outagamie County, WI during excavations. In 1953,
these human remains were donated to the Neville Public Museum by
William Wolf, then-curator of the Charles Grignon House. No known
individuals were identified. The associated funerary objects were not
donated to the Neville Public Museum. The Neville Public Museum feels
that those objects and additional human remains are the responsibility
of the Outagamie County Historical Society and will not attempt re-
constituting the collection for the purpose of repatriation.
    Based on analysis of the associated funerary objects, these
individuals have been determined to be Native American from the Late
Historic period. Historic documents (Bishop Kemper's 1834 tour) further
establish an active Menominee cemetery at or very near this site.
    In 1980, human remains representing two individuals were recovered
from an embankment in Green Bay, WI and donated to the Neville Public
Museum by the City of Green Bay Police Department. No known individuals
were identified. The 604 associated funerary objects include glass
beads and small mammal bones.
    Based on the associated funerary objects and apparent age of the
burials, these individuals have been determined to be Native American.
Further, the presence of black seed beads suggests a Late Historic
period date for the burials. During the Late Historic period, the area
of Green Bay, WI was occupied primarily by the Menominee Indian Tribe.
    The 30 cultural items consist of a stone pipe bowl, six faceted
(cut) blue beads, three dark red beads, four Madison points, two
humpbacked knives, one side-notched point, one bifurcate-base point, 12
faceted (cut) blue beads, and a string of tiny white and dark red
beads.
    In 1923, Mr. Lisle Perizak donated the 12 faceted (cut) blue beads
and the string of tiny white and dark red beads to the Neville Public
Museum. In 1925 and 1935, Mr. J.P. Schumacher sold the remainder of the
cultural items listed above to the Neville Public Museum.
    Museum records state that these 30 cultural items were all removed
from burials in a mound in Green Bay, WI. Archeological records
indicate that historic Menominee burials were located in this mound.
The objects are being affiliated with the Menominee Tribe as they were
all removed from a mound with historic Menominee burials.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the Neville
Public Museum have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the
human remains listed above represent the physical remains of 31
individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Neville
Public Museum have also determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2
(d)(2), the 627 objects listed above are reasonably believed to have
been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death
or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Officials of the
Neville Public Museum have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2
(d)(2)(ii), these 30 cultural items are reasonably believed to have
been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death
or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a
preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific
burial site of an Native American individual. Lastly, officials of the
Neville Public Museum have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2
(e), there is a relationship of shared group identity which can be
reasonably traced between these Native American human remains,
associated funerary objects, and unassociated funerary objects and the
Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Ho-Chunk Nation of
Wisconsin, the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska, and the Menominee Indian
Tribe of Wisconsin. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that
believes itself to be culturally affiliated with these human remains
and associated funerary objects should contact Ann Koski, Director,
Neville Public Museum of Brown County, 210 Museum Place, Green Bay, WI
54303; telephone: (920) 448-4460, before January 19, 1999. Repatriation
of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Menominee
Indian Tribe may begin after that date if no additional claimants come
forward.
Dated: December 8, 1998.
Veletta Canouts,
Acting Departmental Consulting Archeologist,
Deputy Manager, Archeology and Ethnography Program.
[FR Doc. 98-33447 Filed 12-16-98; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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