[Federal Register: August 14, 1998 (Volume 63, Number 157)]
[Notices]
[Page 43722-43723]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr14au98-106]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects from Wisconsin in the Possession of the
State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

AGENCY: National Park Service

ACTION: Notice

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9,
of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated
funerary objects in the possession of the State Historical Society of
Wisconsin, Madison, WI.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by State
Historical Society of Wisconsin professional staff in consultation with
representatives of the Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, Iowa Tribe of Kansas,
Otoe/Missouria Tribe of Oklahoma, Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, and
Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska.
    During 1989-1991, human remains representing a minimum of 139
individuals were recovered from the Tremaine site (47-Lc-0095) by field
crews of the Museum Archaeology Program, State Historical Society of
Wisconsin under a cooperative agreement with the Wisconsin Department
of Transportation as part of

[[Page 43723]]

the USH 53 Expressway Project. No known individuals were identified.
The 139 associated funerary objects include ceramics, sherds,
projectile point, scrapers, and flakes, shell, copper fragments, galena
fragments, stone pipe bowls, catlinite fragments, bison scapula hoes,
river cobbles, mammal bone, and wood fragments.
    Based on radiocarbon data and ceramic typology, the Tremaine site
has been identified as an Oneota occupation dating between 1300-1600
A.D. The Oneota tradition in western Wisconsin has generally been
documented by native oral traditions, European explorers' accounts,
historians, and anthorpologists as ancesteral to the present-day Iowa
Tribe, the Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, and the Winnebago Tribe of
Nebraska.
    In 1989, humam remains representing a minimum of one individual
were recovered from the Filler site (47-Lc-0149) by field crews of the
Museum Archaeology Program, State Historical Society of Wisconsin under
a cooperative agreement with the Wisconsin Department of Transportation
as part of the USH 53 Expressway Project. No known individuals were
identified. No associated funerary objects were present.
    Based on radiocarbon dates and ceramic typology, the Filler site
has been identified as an Oneota Valley View Phase occupation dating
between 1500-1650 A.D. The Oneota tradition in western Wisconsin has
generally been documented by native oral traditions, European
explorers' accounts, historians, and anthorpologists as ancesteral to
the present-day Iowa Tribe, the Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, and the
Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska.
    In 1986 and 1989, human remains representing a minimum of one
indivdiual were recovered from the OT site (47-Lc-0262) by field crews
of the Museum Archaeology Program, State Historical Society of
Wisconsin under a cooperative agreement with the Wisconsin Department
of Transportation as part of the USH 53 Expressway Project. No known
individuals were identified. The 26 associated funerary objects include
ceramics, ceramic sherds, lithics (including projectile points,
scrapers, & flakes), shell, shell beads, a copper disc, copper
beads,
stone pipe bowls, and wood fragments.
    Based on radiocarbon dates and ceramic typology, the OT site has
been identified as an Oneota Valley View phase occupation dating
between 1450-1650 A.D. The Oneota tradition in western Wisconsin has
generally been documented by native oral traditions, European
explorers' accounts, historians, and anthorpologists as ancesteral to
the present-day Iowa Tribe, the Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, and the
Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the State
Historical Society of Wisconsin have determined that, pursuant to 43
CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the physical
remains of a minimum of 141 individuals of Native American ancestry.
Officials of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin have also
determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(2), the 165 objects listed
above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the
death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the State Historical
Society of Wisconsin have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (e),
there is a relationship of shared group identity which can be
reasonably traced between these Native American human remains and
associated funerary objects and the Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Iowa Tribe of
Oklahoma, Iowa Tribe of Kansas, Otoe/Missouria Tribe of Oklahoma, Ho-
Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, and Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska.
Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be
culturally affiliated with these human remains and associated funerary
objects should contact David Wooley, Curator of Anthropology, State
Historical Society of Wisconsin, 816 State Street, Madison, WI 53706-
1488; telephone: (608) 264-6574, before September 14, 1998.
Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to
the Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma may begin after that date if no additional
claimants come forward.
Dated: August 10, 1998.
Francis P. McManamon,
Departmental Consulting Archeologist,
Manager, Archeology and Ethnography Program.
[FR Doc. 98-21835 Filed 8-13-98; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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