[Federal Register: October 15, 1997 (Volume 62, Number 199)]
[Notices]
[Page 53652]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr15oc97-106]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
in the Control of the National Park Service, Haleakala National Park,
Makawao, HI

AGENCY: National Park Service.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C.
3003(d), of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the
control of the National Park Service, Haleakala National Park, Makawao,
HI.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by National
Park Service professional staff in association with professional staff
from the Bishop Museum and in consultation with representatives of the
Hawai`i Island Burial Council, Hui Malama i na Kapuna o Hawai`i Nei,
Kona Hawaiian Civic Club, Maui/Lana`i Island Burial Council, Moloka`i
Island Burial Council, and Office of Hawaiian Affairs. All of the human
remains have been curated by the Anthropology Department of the Bernice
P. Bishop Museum in Honolulu, Hawai`i since their initial recovery.
    Between 1920 and 1962, human remains representing at least 16
individuals were recovered from three sites, located within park
boundaries in and around Haleakala crater, during legally authorized
fieldwork and excavations. No known individuals were identified. No
associated funerary objects were present. The dates for the remains
have not been established but they probably date from both before and
after contact was established between Native Hawaiians and Europeans in
A.D. 1778.
    In 1920, human remains representing two individuals were recovered
from Na Piko Haua, located within the boundaries of Haleakala crater,
during legally authorized fieldwork by Kenneth Emory of the Bishop
Museum. The human remains are two individual bundles, wrapped in blue
cotton fabric, dark brown hair and paper and tied with white thread. No
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are
present. On the basis of information provided by a local guide in 1920,
the bundles' state of preservation, and the presence of imported cotton
cloth, these navel string bundles probably date from the late 19th to
early 20th century. These bundles were donated to the Bishop Museum in
1924 by the collector, who identified them as ``portions of two navel
strings [umbilical cords] wrapped in hair and cloth.''
    Aside from facilities clearly of 20th century origin, virtually all
evidence of human use and occupation of the Haleakala crater area is of
Native Hawaiian origin. Available evidence indicates that Native
Hawaiians are the only group to bury their dead in the crater region.
In addition, the manner of burial of the human remains (in or near
Native Hawaiian structures, in a lava tube, etc.) is consistent with
Native Hawaiian practices during both pre- and post-contact periods.
Further, the Native Hawaiian practice of burying the dead in or near
their home community suggests that all burials found in or near
Haleakala crater on the island of Maui are of people from Maui
communities.
    With regard to the navel string bundles, one of the Native Hawaiian
men who accompanied Emory in 1920 stated that his own umbilical cord
had been hidden at Na Piko Haua. The practice of depositing umbilical
cords in at least this one location in the Haleakala crater was a
Native Hawaiian practice in effect until ca. 1920. As in the case of
burials, it was customary for Native Hawaiians to deposit umbilical
cords in the general vicinity of the community where the birth had
taken place. This practice was confirmed by the Native Hawaiian guide.
Based on this information, the navel string bundles in the collection
are considered to be from infants born in communities on the slopes of
Haleakala.
    Based on the above-mentioned information, officials of the National
Park Service have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the
human remains listed above represent the physical remains of at least
18 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the National
Park Service have also determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3003 (2),
there is a relationship of shared group identity which can reasonably
be traced between these Native American human remains and the Maui/
Lana`i Island Burial Council.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Hawai`i Island Burial
Council, Hui Malama i na Kapuna o Hawai`i Nei, Kona Hawaiian Civic
Club, Maui/Lana`i Island Burial Council, Moloka`i Island Burial
Council, and Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Representatives of any other
Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization that believes itself to be
culturally affiliated with these human remains and associated funerary
objects should contact Don Reeser, Superintendent, Haleakala National
Park, PO Box 369, Makawao, Maui, HI, 96768; telephone: (808) 572-9306,
before [thirty days after publication in the Federal Register].
Repatriation of the human remains to the Maui/Lana`i Island Burial
Council will begin after that date if no additional claimants come
forward.
Dated: October 6, 1997.
Francis P. McManamon,
Departmental Consulting Archeologist,
Manager, Archeology and Ethnography Program.
[FR Doc. 97-27215 Filed 10-14-97; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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