[Federal Register: December 4, 1996 (Volume 61, Number 234)]
[Notices]
[Page 64362-64363]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Notice of Inventory Completion of Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects From the Island of Hawaii in the
Possession of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior,

ACTION: Notice,

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d), of
the completion of the inventory of human remains and associated
funerary objects from the Island of Hawaii in the possession of the
Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum Honolulu, HI.
    A detailed inventory and assessment of these human remains has been
made by Bishop Museum's professional staff and representatives of
Hawaii Island Burial Council, Hui Malama I Na Kupuna 'O Hawai'i Nei,
Department of Hawaiian Homelands, and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs.
    The human remains were found at various times and locations on the
island of Hawaii. Human remains representing a minimum of sixteen
individuals, along with one funerary object, were recovered at various
times from a lava tube complex in Kawaihae, Kohala. In 1905, William
Wagner and Friedrich A. Haenisch removed two wooden bowls, one wooden
image, and one wig, objects which incorporated Native Hawaiian teeth
and hair. These objects were transferred to the museum in 1907. In
1935, J. Everett Brumaghim removed three partial human remains and one
coffin part that were transferred to the museum in 1939. In 1939,
Museum Ethnologist Kenneth P. Emory and Keith K. Jones removed nine
skulls. In 1919, John F.G. Stokes donated the remains of 32 individuals
and five funerary objects that he had found in the sand, south of the
pu'uhonua wall outside the current boundary of Honaunau National Park.
In 1924, E.A. Lister donated the remains of one individual and one
funerary object that he had found during clearing activities at
Mahukona. In 1932, Kenneth P. Emory and Edwin H. Bryan recovered the
remains of one individual during a survey at Kapua. In 1933, Kenneth P.
Emory donated the remains of 33 individuals and six funerary objects
from Honomolino. In 1939, John M. Warinner sold the museum the remains
of two individuals from Kawaihae. In 1939, Kenneth P. Emory recovered
the remains of eight individuals and six funerary objects at Kalala. In
1951, Charles E. Snow donated the remains of nine individuals and eight
funerary objects originally uncovered in 1946 by tidal wave action in
Waipio Valley. In 1951, an unknown person donated the remains of one
individual from Kaloko. In 1959, an unknown person donated the remains
of one individual from Hokukano. In 1960, an unknown person donated the
remains of one individual from Kumukahi. In 1964, Ronald Fellows
donated the remains of three individuals and one funerary object from
Kealakekua. In 1967, Ronald Lin donated the remains of one individual
originally acquired in 1963 on the beach in Waipio Valley. In 1967, an
unknown person donated the remains of four individuals from Kailua-
Kona. In 1970, Yosihiko Sinoto collected the remains of one individual
at Waiahukini. In 1975, Beth Cutting donated the remains of one
individual from the island of Hawaii. Ms. Cutting originally acquired
these remains from an antique store. At an unknown date, an unknown
person donated the remains of five individuals from Keauhou. At an
unknown date, an unknown person donated the remains of one individual
from Kiilae.
    No known individuals were identified. No attempt was made to
determine the age of these human remains at the request of the Hawaii
Island Burial Council, Hui Malama I Na Kupuna 'O Hawai'i Nei, and the
Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The various geographic locations mentioned
above, and the style and type of the identified burials are all
consistent with documented Hawaiian occupation of the island of Hawaii.
Officials of the Bishop Museum feel that the undocumented human remains
are more than likely Native Hawaiian.
    Based on the above information, officials of Bishop Museum have
determined, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), that the human remains
listed above represent the physical remains of 121 individuals of
Native American ancestry. Officials of Bishop Museum have also
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 28 objects
listed above is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the
death rite or ceremony. Officials of Bishop Museum have determined
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2) that there is a relationship of shared
group identity which can be reasonably traced between these remains and
present-day members of Hawaii Island Burial Council, Hui Malama I Na
Kupuna 'O Hawai'i Nei, Department of Hawaiian Homelands, and the Office
of Hawaiian Affairs.
    This notice has been sent to the Hawaii Island Burial Council, Hui
Malama I Na Kupuna 'O Hawai'i Nei, and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs.
Representatives of any Native Hawaiian organization which believes
itself to be culturally affiliated with these human remains should
contact Janet Ness, Registrar, Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, 1525
Bernice Street, Honolulu, Hawaii, 96817-0916, 808-848-4105, before
January 3, 1997. Repatriation of the human remains to the Hawaii Island
Burial Council, Hui Malama I Na Kupuna 'O Hawai'i Nei, Department of
Hawaiian Homelands and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs may

[[Page 64363]]

begin after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
Dated: November 22, 1996.
Richard C. Waldbauer,
Acting, Departmental Consulting Archeologist,
Acting Manager, Archeology and Ethnography Program.
[FR Doc. 96-30818 Filed 12-3-96; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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