[Federal Register: April 29, 1996 (Volume 61, Number 83)]
[Notices]
[Page 18754-18755]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects in the Possession and Control of the
Santa Fe National Forest, United States Forest Service, Santa Fe, NM

AGENCY: National Park Service

ACTION: Notice

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C.
3003(d), of the completion of an inventory of human remains and
associated funerary objects in the possession and control of the Santa
Fe National Forest, United States Forest Service, Santa Fe, NM.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Peabody
Museum professional staff, Museum of New Mexico professional staff,
United States Forest Service professional staff in consultation with
representatives of the Pueblo of Cochiti, the Pueblo of Santo Domingo,
the Pueblo of San Felipe, the Pueblo of Santa Ana, the Pueblo of San
Ildefonso, the Pueblo of Santa Clara, the Pueblo of Pojoaque, the
Pueblo of Tesuque, the Pueblo of Nambe, the Pueblo of San Juan, the
Pueblo of Zia, and the Pueblo of Jemez.
    In 1908, human remains representing five individuals were recovered
from the Yapashi site during legally authorized excavations. No known
individuals were identified.  No associated funerary objects are
present.
    The Yapashi site has been identified as late Anasazi period (1250-
1475 AD) through architecture, ceramics, and site organization.
Ethnographic records, technological continuity, and similarities
between the site and present-day pueblos of Cochiti, Santo Domingo, San
felipe, Santa Ana, San Ildefonso, Santa Clara, Pojoaque, Tesuque,
Nambe, San Juan, and Zia indicate continuity of both occupation and
culture between the Yapashi site and these pueblos. Oral traditions of

[[Page 18755]]

these present-day pueblos indicate occupation of this particular area
during this period.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the United
States Forest Service have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2
(d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the physical remains
of five individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the
United States Forest Service have further determined that, pursuant to
25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity
which can be reasonably traced between these Native American human
remains and the Pueblo of Cochiti, the Pueblo of Santo Domingo, the
Pueblo of San Felipe, the Pueblo of Santa Ana, the Pueblo of San
Ildefonso, the Pueblo of Santa Clara, the Pueblo of Pojoaque, the
Pueblo of Tesuque, the Pueblo of Nambe, the Pueblo of San Juan, and the
Pueblo of Zia.
    In 1912, human remains representing two individuals were recovered
from the Pueblo Kotyiti site during legally authorized excavations. No
known individuals were identified. The three associated funerary
objects include a ceramic pipe, mineral pigment, and a stone tool.
    The Pueblo Kotyiti site has been identified as the fortified pueblo
occupied during 1680-1696 (the Great Pueblo Revolt) by the ancestral
community of the present-day Pueblo of Cochiti. This identification is
supported by historical and ethnohistoric records of the Pueblo Revolt
era, continuities of architecture and ceramics between the site and the
Pueblo of Cochiti. The oral tradition of the Pueblo of Cochiti also
supports their affiliation to the Pueblo Kotyiti site.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the United
States Forest Service have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2
(d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the physical remains
of two individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the United
States Forest Service have also determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C.
3001 (3)(A), the three objects listed above are reasonably believed to
have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of
death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials
of the United States Forest Service have determined that, pursuant to
25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity
which can be reasonably traced between these Native American human
remains and associated funerary objects and the Pueblo of Cochiti.
    In 1934, human remains representing three individuals from site LA
340 were donated to the Museum of New Mexico by the Fry family.
Accession records indicate the Fry family apparently collected these
remains without a valid antiquities permit. No known individuals were
identified. No associated funerary objects were present.
    Site LA 340 has been identified as Anasazi period (1100-1540 AD)
through architecture, ceramics, and site organization. Ethnographic
records, technological continuity, and similarities of the site with
the present-day pueblos of San Ildefonso, Santa Clara, Pojoaque,
Tesuque, Nambe, and San Juan indicate cultural affiliation with this
site. The oral traditions of these six Pueblos also indicate
affiliation with sites in this particular area during this period.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the United
States Forest Service have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2
(d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the physical remains
of three individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the
United States Forest Service have further determined that, pursuant to
25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity
which can be reasonably traced between these Native American human
remains and the Pueblo of San Ildefonso, the Pueblo of Santa Clara, the
Pueblo of Pojoaque, the Pueblo of Tesuque, the Pueblo of Nambe, the
Pueblo of San Juan.
    In 1980, human remains representing six individuals from site AR-
03-10-03-401 were confiscated by Forest Service Law Enforcement from
Kyle and Mary Martin. No known individuals were identified. The 200
associated funerary objects include pottery sherds, stone tools and
flakes, corn cobs and husks, sandal fragments, charcoal, non-human
bones and teeth, and seeds.
    Ethnographic and ethnohistoric records, ceramics, and the
association of the rock shelters with an ancestral Jemez Pueblo site
indicate cultural affiliation of the present-day Pueblo of Jemez to
site AR-03-10-03-401. The oral traditions of the Pueblos of Jemez
support this affiliation to the site during this period.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the United
States Forest Service have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2
(d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the physical remains
of six individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the United
States Forest Service have also determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C.
3001 (3)(A), the 200 objects listed above are reasonably believed to
have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of
death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials
of the United States Forest Service have determined that, pursuant to
25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity
which can be reasonably traced between these Native American human
remains and associated funerary objects and the Pueblo of Jemez.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Pueblo of Cochiti,
the Pueblo of Santo Domingo, the Pueblo of San Felipe, the Pueblo of
Santa Ana, the Pueblo of San Ildefonso, the Pueblo of Santa Clara, the
Pueblo of Pojoaque, the Pueblo of Tesuque, the Pueblo of Nambe, the
Pueblo of San Juan, the Pueblo of Zia, and the Pueblo of Jemez.
Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be
culturally affiliated with these human remains and associated funerary
objects should contact Dr. Frank E. Wozniak, NAGPRA Coordinator,
Southwestern Region, USDA Forest Service, 517 Gold Ave. SW,
Albuquerque, NM 87102; telephone: (505) 842-3238, fax: (505) 842-3800
before May 29, 1996. Repatriation of the human remains and associated
funerary objects to the Pueblo of Cochiti, the Pueblo of Santo Domingo,
the Pueblo of San Felipe, the Pueblo of Santa Ana, the Pueblo of San
Ildefonso, the Pueblo of Santa Clara, the Pueblo of Pojoaque, the
Pueblo of Tesuque, the Pueblo of Nambe, the Pueblo of San Juan, the
Pueblo of Zia, and the Pueblo of Jemez may begin after that date if no
additional claimants come forward.
Dated: April 24, 1996
Francis P. McManamon
Departmental Consulting Archeologist
Chief, Archeology & Ethnography Program
[FR Doc. 96-10543 Filed 4-26-96; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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