Detail of restored roof; Link to Parknet
STANDARDS FOR RESTORATION AND GUIDELINES FOR RESTORING HISTORIC BUILDINGS
<photo>character of a historic town center

Identify    Protect    Repair    Replace    Remove   Re-Create

Identify, Retain and Preserve

Recommend
Identifying retaining, and preserving restoration period building and landscape features of the setting. Such features can include roads and streets, furnishings such as lights or benches, vegetation, gardens and yards, adjacent open space such as fields, parks, commons or woodlands, and important views or visual relationships.

photo of  historically significant Mount Auburn Cemetery in Boston, MA, showing the need for ongoing preservation of its original features

Mount Auburn Cemetery, Massachusetts, established a new type of burial ground in the late 19th century that influenced landscape architects of the day--it was Boston's first suburban park. Because of its historical significance, the materials, features and spatial relationships from this period need to be preserved to the greatest extent possible. Photo: HABS Collection, NPS.

Re-establishing the relationship between buildings and landscape features of the setting that existed during the restoration period.

Not Recommended
Altering features of the setting that can be documented to the restoration period.

Failing to properly document restoration period building and landscape features which may result in their loss.

Retaining non-restoration period buildings or landscape features.

Protect and Maintain

Recommend
Protecting and maintaining building materials and plant features from the restoration period through appropriate cleaning, rust removal, limited paint removal, and reapplication of protective coating systems; and pruning and vegetation management.

photo demonstrating the need to protect historic buildings in the vicinity against damage during restoration of one building

When restoration work is being undertaken on one historic building, it is important to protect buildings in the vicinity against damage. Depending upon the nature of the adjacent project, protective measures may include documenting and monitoring the historic structure or encompass a broader plan that includes encasing windows, independent review of excavation procedures and a range of other precautions. Photo: NPS files.

Protecting buildings and landscape features against arson and vandalism before restoration work begins by erecting protective fencing and installing alarm systems that are keyed into local protection agencies.

Evaluating the existing condition of the building and landscape features to determine whether more than protection and maintenance are required, that is, if repairs to features will be necessary.

Not Recommended
Failing to provide adequate protection of materials on a cyclical basis which results in the deterioration of building and landscape features.

Permitting the building and setting to remain unprotected so that interior or exterior features are damaged.

Stripping or removing features from buildings or the setting such as wood siding, iron fencing, terra cotta balusters, or plant material.

Failing to undertake adequate measures to assure the protection of building and landscape features.

Repair

Recommend
Repairing restoration period features of the building and landscape by reinforcing the historic materials. Repair will generally include the replacement in kind--or with compatible substitute material--of those extensively deteriorated or missing parts of features where there are surviving prototypes such as porch balustrades or paving materials. The new work should be unobtrusively dated to guide future research and treatment.

Not Recommended
Replacing an entire restoration period feature of the building or landscape setting when repair of materials and limited replacement of deteriorated or missing parts are appropriate.

Using a substitute material for the replacement part that does not convey the visual appearance of the surviving parts of the building or landscape, or that is physically, chemically, or ecologically incompatible.

Replace

Recommend
Replacing in kind an entire restoration period feature of the building or landscape that is too deteriorated to repair--when the overall form and detailing are still evident--using the physical evidence as a model to guide the new work. If using the same kind of material is not technically or economically feasible, then a compatible substitute material may be considered. The new work should be unobtrusively dated to guide future research and treatment.

Not Recommended
Removing a restoration period feature of the building or landscape that is unrepairable and not replacing it; or failing to document the new work.

The following Restoration work is highlighted to indicate that it involves the removal or alteration of existing features of the historic setting that would be retained in Preservation and Rehabilitation treatments; and the replacement of missing features from the restoration period using all new materials in order to create an accurate historic appearance.

Removing Existing Features from Other Historic Periods

Recommend
Removing or altering features of the building or landscape from other historic periods, such as a later road, sidewalk, or fence.

Documenting features of the building or landscape dating from other periods prior to their alteration or removal.

paired photos before and after restoration of the Bronson-Mulholland House, Palatka, FL, and its setting

The Bronson-Mulholland House in Palatka, Florida, ca. 1845, is shown (left) before and (right) after the treatment, Restoration. Over the years the east (far right) side of the veranda had been filled in as a sixth bay. During the restoration, this later infill was removed and the east veranda, together with its flooring, stairs, and foundation, restored. The landscape was returned to its original appearance, based on documentation. Photo: City of Palatka, Community Development Department.

Not Recommended
Failing to remove a feature of the building or landscape from another period, thus creating an inaccurate historic appearance.

Failing to document features of the building or landscape from other historic periods that are removed from the setting so that a valuable portion of the historic record is lost.

Re-creating Missing Features from the Restoration Period

Recommend
Re-creating a missing feature of the building or landscape in the setting that existed during the restoration period based on physical or documentary evidence; for example, duplicating a path or park bench.

Not Recommended
Constructing a feature of the building or landscape that was part of the original design for the setting but was never actually built; or constructing a feature which was thought to have existed during the restoration period, but for which there is insufficient documentation.

 

-GUIDELINES-

The Approach

Exterior Materials
Masonry
Wood
Architectural Metals

Exterior Features
Roofs
Windows
Entrances + Porches
Storefronts

Interior Features
Structural System Spaces/Features/Finishes
Mechanical Systems

Site

Setting

Special Requirements
Energy Efficiency
Accessibility
Health + Safety

The Standards

 

  HISTORICAL OVERVIEW - PRESERVING - REHABILITATING - restoring- RECONSTRUCTING

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Historical Overview