<photo> Detail of interior wood feature; Link to National Park Service
Introduction to Standards and Guidelines: Historical Overview
<photo>significant hallway and staircase, Department of Interior, Washington, DC

An interior floor plan, the arrangement and sequence of spaces, and built-in features and applied finishes are individually and collectively important in defining the historic character of the building. Interiors are comprised of a series of primary and secondary spaces. This is applicable to all buildings, from courthouses to cathedrals, to cottages and office buildings. Primary spaces, including entrance halls, parlors, or living rooms, assembly rooms and lobbies, are defined not only by their function, but also by their features, finishes, size and proportion.

Secondary spaces are often more functional than decorative, and may include kitchens, bathrooms, mail rooms, utility spaces, secondary hallways, firestairs and office cubicles in a commercial or office space. Extensive changes can often be made in these less important areas without having a detrimental effect on the overall historic character.

-INTRODUCTION-

Choosing Treatment

Using the Standards + Guidelines

-Historical Overview-

Exterior Materials
Masonry
Wood
Architectural Metals

Exterior Features
Roofs
Windows
Entrances + Porches
Storefronts

Interior Features
Structural System Spaces/Features/Finishes
Mechanical Systems

Site

Setting

Special Requirements
Energy Efficiency
Accessibility
Health + Safety
New Additions

 

 

historical overview - PRESERVING - REHABILITATING - RESTORING - RECONSTRUCTING

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