<photo> Detail of interior wood feature; Link to National Park Service
Introduction to Standards and Guidelines: Historical Overview
<Photo>Person using accessible ramp

Work that must be done to meet accessibility requirements, health and safety requirements or retrofitting to improve energy efficiency is usually not part of the overall process of protecting historic buildings; rather, this work is assessed for its potential impact on the historic building.

It is often necessary to make modifications to a historic building so that it will be in compliance with current accessibility code requirements. Accessibility to certain historic structures is required by three specific federal laws: the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Federal rules, regulations, and standards have been developed which provide guidance on how to accomplish access to historic areas for people with disabilities. Work must be carefully planned and undertaken so that it does not result in the loss of character-defining spaces, features, and finishes. The goal is to provide the highest level of access with the lowest level of impact.

 

-INTRODUCTION-

Choosing Treatment

Using the Standards + Guidelines

-Historical Overview-

Exterior Materials
Masonry
Wood
Architectural Metals

Exterior Features
Roofs
Windows
Entrances + Porches
Storefronts

Interior Features
Structural System Spaces/Features/Finishes
Mechanical Systems

Site

Setting

Special Requirements
Energy Efficiency
Accessibility
Health + Safety
New Additions

 

 

historical overview - PRESERVING - REHABILITATING - RESTORING - RECONSTRUCTING

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