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Taking Command of Change:
A Practical Guide for Applying the Strategic Development Process
in State Historic Preservation Offices

by
Doug Eadie, President
Doug Eadie Presents!, Frisco, Texas
Web Edition 2003
(originally published in 1995 by the National Park Service and
The National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers)

 
Taking Command
of Change
Table of Contents
 
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgements
Executive Summary

1. Overview
 
2. Creating a Strategic Framework
 
3. External and Internal Environments
 
4. Issue Identification and Selection
 
5. Strategy Formulation
 
6. Launching a Strategic Development Process
 
7. You Can Do It!
 
8. Sources of Information on Strategic Development

 
 
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SLHR 2003

 
7. YOU CAN DO IT!

SHPO Offices face a stark choice in today’s world:

  • A SHPO Office can choose to be PROACTIVE – creatively and systematically leading and managing change, taking command of its own development and growth.

  • Or a SHPO Office can be PASSIVE AND REACTIVE – being changed by the forces around it and reacting to events as they occur.

THERE IS NO MIDDLE GROUND: EITHER DO, OR BE DONE UNTO!

The good news in today’s challenging environment is that the Strategic Development Process described in this Guidebook is a powerful tool for proactive planning and management, and any SHPO Office that makes the proactive choice can put the Strategic Development Process into practice. No matter how threatening its environment, how straitened its resources, or how complex its politics, the SHPO Office that is committed to applying the Strategic Development Process can put it to good use.

We are not talking of tilting at windmills. By fashioning a detailed gameplan – or design – for applying the Strategic Development Process that is tailored to its unique situation, a SHPO Office can ensure that its investment of time and energy yields valuable results. The pace may be slower than ideal, the reach shorter than we would like, but the results, however modest, will always be preferable to the high price of passivity and inaction.

 

 

 

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