Water cascading over a dam, Laguna Dam, Distant Dam
Discover Our Shared Heritage Travel Itinerary
Bureau of Reclamation Historic Dams and Water Projects
Managing Water in the West


Learn More

The Learn More page provides additional information relating to a wide range of topics associated with the dams and water projects featured in the itinerary. The resources are organized by state as they appear in the List of Sites. Bureau of Reclamation sites are listed first, followed by recreation information sites and finally local and state tourism sites.

You can find additional information on the Bureau of Reclamation website.

By clicking on these links, you can go directly to a particular section:

Bureau of Reclamation Historic Dams, Tourism, and Recreation Websites - Listed under the appropriate State and Bureau of Reclamation Project

Idaho
Montana
Nevada

Other Relevant Websites
Selected Bibliography for Historic Bureau of Reclamation Dams



Bureau of Reclamation Historic Dams, Tourism, and Recreation Websites

Arizona

Bartlett Dam

Hoover Dam


Laguna Dam

Parker Dam

California

Shasta Dam

Colorado

Gunnison Tunnel

Idaho

Anderson Ranch Dam and Power Plant
Arrowrock Dam
Minidoka Dam and Power Plant

Montana

Gibson Dam

Hungry Horse Dam

Nevada

Derby Diversion Dam
Hoover Dam

Lahontan Dam and Power Station

New Mexico

Avalon Dam

Elephant Butte Dam

Leasburg Diversion Dam

Percha Diversion Dam

Oregon

Owyhee Dam

South Dakota

Belle Fourche Dam

Washington

Grand Coulee Dam

Tieton Dam

Wyoming

Buffalo Bill Dam

Glendo Dam

Guernsey Dam


Pathfinder Dam


Other Relevant Websites

American Memory at the Library of Congress Search this website for documents, photographs, and other materials relating to America’s diverse population.

American Scenic Byways This website, maintained by the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, includes information on state and nationally designated byway routes throughout America based on their archeological, cultural, historic, natural, recreational and scenic qualities.

DamTour is a loose organization of motorcyclists who set up an annual challenge for themselves of riding to different dams throughout the Pacific Northwest.

Discover Our Shared Heritage Travel Itineraries Other travel itineraries in the National Park Service series include many historic destinations to visit online and in person. Each itinerary spotlights a different geographic region or theme.

Heritage Documentation Programs in the American Memory: Built in America Heritage Documentation Programs, National Park Service, administers HABS (Historic American Buildings Survey), the Federal Government’s oldest operating preservation program, and companion programs, HAER (Historic American Engineering Record), HALS (Historic American Landscapes Survey), and CRGIS (Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems). Drawings, maps, photographs, and historical reports produced through the programs and archived at the Library of Congress constitute the nation’s largest collection of historical architectural, engineering, and landscape documentation.

National Heritage Areas Places designated by the United States Congress where natural, cultural, historic and recreational resources combine to form a cohesive, nationally-distinctive landscape arising from patterns of human activity shaped by geography. These areas tell nationally important stories about our nation and are representative of the national experience through both the physical features that remain and the traditions that have evolved within them.

Historic Hotels of America A feature of the National Trust for Historic Preservation's Heritage Traveler program that provides information on historic hotels and package tours in the vicinity of sites included in this itinerary.

National Historic Landmarks National Historic Landmarks are nationally significant historic places designated by the Secretary of the Interior because they possess exceptional value in interpreting the heritage of the United States. Today, fewer than 2,500 historic places bear this national distinction.

National Park Service The main National Park Service website is the gateway to national parks, information on preserving America’s history and culture in parks and communities, and a vast amount of other useful information on National Park Service programs, history and culture, nature and science, education, and other topics.

National Park Service Elwha River Restoration Project The Elwha is the largest watershed in Olympic National Park. The National Park Service is managing the largest dam removal project in U.S. history, removing the Elwha and Glines Canyon dams to reopen more than 70 miles of pristine spawning and rearing habitat in the Elwha River and its tributaries. For information on this project, visit the National Park Service Olympic National Park Elwha River Restoration Project website, which includes a link to the Elwha River Restoration Webcams where viewers can see the progress being made on dam removal.

National Park Service History E-Library This website includes many useful NPS documents on National Park System units associated with cultural heritage and other related historical themes.

National Park Service Office of Sustainable Tourism National Parks have been interwoven with tourism from their earliest days. This website highlights the ways in which the National Park Service promotes and supports sustainable, responsible, informed and managed visitor use through cooperation and coordination with the tourism industry.

National Register of Historic Places The National Register of Historic Places is the nation’s official inventory of historic places worthy of preservation. Districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects significant in American history, architecture, archeology, engineering, and culture are included in the National Register, which is expanded and maintained by the National Park Service (NPS). The National Register website is the gateway to information on authentic registered historic places, the benefits of recognition, and how to become involved in identifying, nominating to the National Register, and protecting these irreplaceable reminders of our heritage.

National Trust for Historic Preservation The National Trust for Historic Preservation is a United States Congress-chartered non-profit group that preserves historic places, publishes information about preservation, and operates preservation initiatives. Learn about the programs and membership in the oldest national nonprofit preservation organization.

Teaching with Historic Places This website, maintained by the National Park Service, offers online classroom-ready place-based lesson plans created by historians and educators to help teachers use historic places in the classroom. Each lesson is linked to national standards for history and the social studies.

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Selected Bibliography

Abrams, Robert H. “When states collide: Allocating the waters of the North Platte River,” (January 13, 1993), http://heinonline.org.

“Annual Pilgrimage of Salt River Water Users to Bartlett Dam,” The Reclamation Era (April 1938), 68.

Autobee, Robert, “North Platte Project,” (Denver: Bureau of Reclamation History Program, 1996).

_______.”Rio Grande Project,” (Denver: Bureau of Reclamation History Program, 1994).

_____. “Salt River Project,” (Denver: Bureau of Reclamation Projects Book, n.d.).

______.“The Sun River Project,” (Denver: Bureau of Reclamation History Program, 1995).

Baker, T. Lindsay, “The Construction of the Yuma Project 1905-1912,” History of Engineering Program, Texas Tech University.

Barringer, Felicity, “Water Use in Southwest Heads for a Day of Reckoning, The New York Times, September 27, 2010. http://www.nytimes.com, Accessed September 28, 2010.

Belle Fourche, South Dakota, Chamber of Commerce. http://www.bellefourchechamber.org.

Betts, C.A., “High Lights of Owyhee Dam Construction,” The Reclamation Era (April 1935), 81-83.

Billings Gazette, “Buffalo Bill Dam brought irrigation, settlers to Bighorn Basin,” January 13, 2010. http://billingsgazette.com. Accessed June 28, 2010.

Billington, David P., Donald C. Jackson and Martin V. Melosi, The History of Large Federal Dams: Planning, Design, and Construction in the Era of Big Dams (Denver: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, 2005).

Billington, David P., and Donald C. Jackson, Big Dams of the New Deal Era: A Confluence of Engineering and Politics (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2006).

Bogener, Steve, “Carlsbad Project,” (Denver: Bureau of Reclamation History Program, 1993).

“Boulder Dam,” Fortune, Vol. 8, No. 3 (September 1933), p. 74-88.

“Boulder Dam in Color,” Fortune, Vol. 9, No. 5 (May 1934), p. 92-100.

Burton, J., Farrell, M., Lord, F., and Lord, R. “Confinement and Ethnicity: An Overview of World War II Japanese American Relocation Sites” (U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service).

“Central Valley Project,” (Denver: U.S. Bureau of Reclamation History Program, 1994).

Chisholm, Graham and Larry A. Neel. Birds of the Lahontan Valley: A Guide to Nevada’s Wetland Oasis. Reno: University of Nevada Press, 2002.

Christensen, Rick and Brent Mefford, “A Struggle of Needs: A History of Bureau of Reclamation Fish Passage Projects on the Truckee River, Nevada,” in Reclamation, Managing Water in the West: The Bureau of Reclamation: History Essays from the Centennial Symposium, Volume 1 (Denver: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, 2008), p. 209-220.

City of Phoenix, Arizona, “Out of the Ashes,” http://phoenix.gov.

City of Stockton, California. http://www.stocktongov.com.

City of Yuma, Arizona. http://www.ci.yuma.az.us/.

Colorado State University, “Colorado’s Gunnison Tunnel celebrates 100 years,” www.today.colostate.edu. Accessed July 6, 2010.

“Construction of Boulder Dam” (Boulder City, Nevada: Boulder Dam Service Bureau, n.d.)

Couch, Jim, “Introduction: The Great Depression and the New Deal.” Online at eh.net/encyclopedia. Accessed September 27, 2010.

Dexheimer, W.A. “Construction of the World’s Highest Multiple Arch Dam,” The Reclamation Era (August 1938), 158-162.

Dudley, Shelly C., “The First Five: A Brief Overview of the First Reclamation Projects Authorized by the Secretary of the Interior on March 14, 1903 in Reclamation, Managing Water in the West: The Bureau of Reclamation: History Essays from the Centennial Symposium, Volume 1 (Denver: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, 2008), p. 289-313.

Edwards, Jerome, “Comstock Lode,” Online Nevada Encyclopedia. www.onlinenevada.org. Accessed August 24, 2010.

Fees, Paul, “William F. Cody (Buffalo Bill).” Accessed online June 28, 2010. No longer available.

Flathead County, Montana. http://flathead.mt.gov

Forbes, R.H., “History of Irrigation Development in Arizona,” The Reclamation Era (October 1936), 226-227.

Fort, Denise D. “Water and Population in the American West,” Yale F & ES Bulletin (2002).

Frank, Walter Smoter, “Swastikas on the Colorado,” http://smoter.com/flooddam/swastika.htm. Accessed November 16, 2010.

Gruen, J. Philip, “Colorado River Aqueduct” (Historic American Engineering Record, 1998).

“Gunnison Tunnel Finished,” The New York Times, August 22, 1909.

Harvey, David W. “Tieton Dam,” (Historic American Engineering Record, 1988).

Historic Preservation Council, Ada County, Idaho, “Ada County Chronicles,” http://www.adaweb.net.

“History of Belle Fourche,” Tri-State Museum. http://www.thetristatemuseum.com.

“History of Electricity,” www.need.org.

Hop Growers of America. http://www.usahops.org.

“Hoover Dam,” Fortune, Vol. 5, No. 3 (March 1932), p. 53-56.

Hubber, Ann “Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake (Historic American Engineering Record, 1997).

Hufstetler, Mark and Lon Johnson, Watering the Land: The Turbulent History of the Carlsbad Irrigation District (Denver: National Park Service, 1993).

“Hungry Horse Dam,” http://www.visitmt.com.

Idaho Department of Agriculture, www.agri.idaho.gov.

Idaho Museum of Natural History, http://imnh.isu.edu.

Introcaso, David M., Bartlett Dam (San Francisco: Historic American Engineering Record, 1990).

Jackson, Donald C., Great American Bridges and Dams (Washington, D.C.: The Preservation Press, 1988).

Koppen, E.C. “Building Bartlett Dam,” The Reclamation Era (November 1939), 308-314.

_____. “Salt River Delegation Visits Bartlett Dam Site,” The Reclamation Era (May 1937), 97-98.

“Lahontan Valley Wetlands,” Audubon Society. http://iba.audubon.org.

“Lake Mead National Recreation Area,” Arizona Highways (May 1964), p. 2-6. Lewis, David Rich, Neither Wolf Nor Dog: American Indians, Environment, and Agrarian Change (New York: Oxford University Press, 1994).

Linenberger, Toni Rae, Dams, Dynamos, and Development: The Bureau of Reclamation’s Power and Electrification of the West (Washington, D.C., 2002).

_______. “The Parker-Davis Project History” (Denver: Bureau of Reclamation History Program, 1997).
MacDonnell, Lawrence J, From Reclamation to Sustainability: Water, Agriculture, and the Environment in the American West (Boulder: University Press of Colorado, 1999).

McCune, Christopher J. “Belle Fourche Project” (Denver: Bureau of Reclamation, 2001).

Minidoka County, Idaho. http://www.minidoka.id.us.

Murphy, Paul L. “Early Irrigation in the Boise Valley,” Pacific Northwest Quarterly 44 (October 1935), 177-184.

National Audubon Society, “Lahonton Valley Wetlands,” http://iba.audubon.org. Accessed August 25, 2010.

Nevada Division of State Parks. http://parks.nv.gov.

New Mexico State Parks. http://www.emnrd.state.nm.us/PRD/.

_______. “New West, True West: Interpreting the Region’s History,” in Clyde A. Milner II, et al, Major Problems in the History of the American West (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1997, 2nd ed.).

Online Encyclopedia of Washington State History. http://www.historylink.org.

Online Nevada Encyclopedia, “Lahontan Dam,” www.onlinenevada.org. Accessed August 24, 2010.

Oregon State University, Malheur Experiment Station, “Owyhee River,” http://www.cropinfo.net. Accessed November 24, 2010.

Parker Area Chamber of Commerce, “Parker Dam,” http:www.parkerareachamberofcommerce.com.

Peplow, Edward H. Jr., The Taming of the Salt (Phoenix: Communications & Public Affairs Department, 1979).

Pfaff, Christine E. The Bureau of Reclamation’s Civilian Conservation Corps Legacy: 1933-1942 (Denver, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2010).

_______. Harvests of Plenty: A History of the Yakima Irrigation Project, Washington (Denver: U.S. Department of the Interior, 2002).

_____. The Bureau of Reclamation’s Architectural Legacy: 1902-1955 (Denver: U.S. Department of the Interior, 2007).

Pisani, Donald J., “Federal Reclamation in the Twentieth Century: A Centennial Retrospective” in Reclamation, Managing Water in the West: The Bureau of Reclamation: History Essays from the Centennial Symposium, Volume 2 (Denver: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, 2008), p. 611-635.

“Plaque Erected at Boulder Dam Memorializes Workers,” The Reclamation Era (January 1938), p. 6-7, 10.

________. To Reclaim a Divided West: Water, Law, and Public Policy, 1848-1902 (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1992).

Potter, Lori, “Platte water rights divvy up snowmelt, but there’s no easy way to do that,” KearneyHub.com. (July 27, 2010). Accessed December 23, 2010.

Quivik, Fredric L. “Owyhee Dam,” (Historic American Engineering Record, 1991).

“Reclamation Act/Newlands Act of 1902” Center for Columbia River History, http://www.ccrh.org. Accessed September 14, 2010.

Reisner, Marc, Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water (New York: Viking Penguin Inc., 1986).

Robinson, Michael C., “Water for the West: The Bureau of Reclamation, 1902-1977,” Reclamation Era, Vol. 63, No. 1 and 2, p.1-22.

Rowley, William D. The Bureau of Reclamation: Origins and Growth to 1945, Volume 1 (Denver: Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2006).

______. “Francis G. Newlands, Water for the West, and Progressivism,” in Ballard C. Campbell, ed., The Human Tradition in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (Wilmington, Del.: SR Books, 2000), 101-117.

_______. Reclaiming the Arid West: The Career of Francis G. Newlands (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1996).

Scott, Gregg A., Larry K. Nuss, and John LaBoon, “Concrete Dam Evolution: The Bureau of Reclamation’s Contributions to 2002,” in Reclamation, Managing Water in the West: The Bureau of Reclamation: History Essays from the Centennial Symposium, Volume 1 (Denver: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, 2008), p. 1-65.

“Shasta Dam to be World’s Second Largest Concrete Dam,” The Reclamation Era (Decembetr 1937), 281. Shastalake.com.

Sholders, Mike, “Water Supply Development in San Diego and a Review of Related Outstanding Projects,” The Journal of San Diego History, Vol. 48, No. 1, Winter 2002. www.sandiegohistory.org. Accessed 28 September 2010.

Simonds, William Joe, “Hoover Dam: The Boulder Canyon Project” (Denver: Bureau of Reclamation, 1995; rep. December 2009, Brit Storey.

______. “The Boise Project” (Denver: Bureau of Reclamation, 1997).

_______”The Columbia Basin Project” (Denver: Bureau of Reclamation History Program, 1995).

Skerret, R.G. “America’s Wonder River – The Colorado,” in The Story of the Hoover Dam (Las Vegas: Nevada Publications, 1931), p. 17-23.

Springer, Craig, “The Return of a Lake-dwelling Giant,” Endangered Species Bulletin, Vol. 32, No. 1, February 2007, p. 10-11.

Stene, Eric A. “Hungry Horse Project” (Denver: Bureau of Reclamation History Program, 1995).

______. “ The Minidoka Project,” (Denver: Bureau of Reclamation History Program, 1997).

_____. “The Owyhee Project,” (Denver: Bureau of Reclamation History Program, 1996).

_____. “Yuma Project and Yuma Auxiliary Project,” (Denver: Bureau of Reclamation History Program, 1996).

“The Central Valley Project, California,” The Reclamation Era (July 1937), 156-57.

“The Story of Hoover Dam,” (Washington, D.C.: United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, 1976).

Townley, John M. Turn This Water into Gold: The Story of the Newlands Project. Reno: Nevada Historical Society, 1977, rep. Susan A. James, ed., 1998.

________. Alfalfa Country: Nevada Land, Water & Politics in the 19th Century. [ Reno]: Agricultural Experiment Station, Max C. Fleischmann College of Agriculture, University of Nevada, Reno, [1980?].

Tassava, Christopher J. “The American Economy during World War II,” http://eh.net. Accessed October 13, 2010.

United States Department of Agriculture. http://www.usda.gov.

United States Department of the Interior, Water and Power Resources Service: Project Data (Denver: United States Government Printing Office, 1981).

________. The Bureau of Reclamation: History Essays from the Centennial Symposium, 2 Vols (Denver: U. S. Department of the Interior, 2008).

______. The Colorado River (Washington, D.C.: Bureau of Reclamation, 1946).

Vivian, C.H. “Construction of Hoover Dam,” in The Story of Hoover Dam (Las Vegas: Nevada Publications, 1986?, rep. from Compressed Air Magazine, 1931-35).

Warner, Eva, “Historical Sketch of Heyburn (Idaho),” http://heyburnidaho.org (Accessed November 30, 2010).

Water Education Foundation, “Colorado River Facts,” http://www.watereducation.org. Accessed November 15, 2010.

Welch, Patrick, “Mitigation Report for Adverse Effects to Derby Dam…”(Sacramento, Calif.: Bureau of Reclamation, 2002).

Worster, Donald, Rivers of Empire: Water, Aridity, and the Growth of the American West (New York: Oxford University Press, 1985).

_______. “New West, True West: Interpreting the Region’s History,” in Clyde A. Milner II, et al, Major Problems in the History of the American West (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1997, 2nd ed.).

“Wyoming, Nebraska agree to settle long battle over North Platte River water,” U.S. Water News (June 2000), http://www.uswaternews.com.

“Yakima Project,” (Denver: U.S. Bureau of Reclamation History Project, 1993).

Yuma Crossing Heritage Area, http://www.yumaheritage.com.



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