• An open vista frames two white grave stone and a flag in the distance with a white cottage in the foreground.

    Herbert Hoover

    National Historic Site Iowa

Methodist Church and C.E. Smith House

When Herbert Hoover was growing up, a Methodist Church, built in 1870, occupied the lot where C.E. Smith’s house now stands. A towering three-story steeple impressively pointed to the heavens, and it’s likely the Hoover household heard its ringing bell on Sunday mornings. An 11-foot tall street lamp is a historic reconstruction of the copper lantern box and post that stood in front of that church. The original lamp burned kerosene oil, and was one of eleven that were lighting the streets of West Branch by 1883.

 
Black and white photograph of a white church with a steeple and gothic windows.
The Methodist Church in West Branch as photographed in 1900.
Herbert Hoover NHS Collection
 
A round porch with a pointed roof adjoins a large white and blue house.

The Queen Anne style C.E. Smith house features an octagonal porch.

Linda Staats

The house that you see here today is known as the C.E. Smith House. Charles E. Smith was a carpenter and a Civil War veteran. In 1903, he completed his dream home for himself and his wife, Deborah atop Cooks Hill where each spring, he would tap his maple trees to make maple syrup. Although this home was built eighteen years after Herbert Hoover left West Branch, the National Park Service decided to relocate it here in 1969.

This large, white, one and a half story Queen Anne style house includes intersecting gables. Cut cedar shingles painted a robin’s egg blue, are used for the siding underneath the gables. One of the most unusual features of this house is the open octagon-shaped front porch; its sloping tent roof is supported by four machine turned posts framed with decoratively scrolled brackets. The Smith home’s graceful and charming appearance fits comfortably in the neighborhood, and contributes to the historic setting of the Iowa village that President Hoover called home. Interestingly, Mr. Smith’s wife, Deborah, was also the sister of Dr. Leech, whose own home is preserved on Downey Street.

 

 

Take a Virtual Tour

This is a stop on the virtual tour of Herbert Hoover National Historic Site.

« Historic Homes on Downey Street | Garvin House »

Did You Know?

Hoover's birthplace as it appeared before restoration: a two-story white frame house.

Herbert Hoover's birthplace was a tourist attraction as early as 1928. Jennie Scellers, the house's owner, charged 10 cents for tours and set up a souvenir stand on her lawn. More...