• Pink flowers blossom in the garden of a white two-room cottage.

    Herbert Hoover

    National Historic Site Iowa

Laban Miles House

A yellow two story house with brown trim.

The Laban Miles family, related to the Hoovers by marriage, lived in this house on Downey Street.

NPS Photo

This yellow, two story L-shaped structure with the offset porch was built sometime between 1869 and 1872. Cedar County Deed Records show that in 1875, Laban Miles purchased the home at 113 S. Downey Street for $2,250.00. In 1870, Miles had married Hulda Hoover’s younger sister, Agnes Minthorn, just five days after Hulda and Jesse Hoover were wed. Now they were settling down with a family of their own.

There was much visiting back and forth between the Miles and Hoover homes, and the two families became close friends. The short walk on Downey Street often brought the Hoover children, Tad, Bertie, and Mary, together with their cousins for playtime or a shared pot of soup that had spent the day simmering on a wood stove. But their time together was short-lived.

In the spring of 1878, President Rutherford B. Hayes appointed Miles to serve as an agent responsible for the care and education of the Osage and Kaw tribes in the Oklahoma territory. When Laban, Agnes and their children left that summer, they rented their home first to the Methodist Church for a parsonage, and then to Dr. L.J. Leech, a well-known and respected physician in West Branch.

But the ties between the Miles and Hoover families remained strong. Following Jesse Hoover’s death, Laban Miles asked Hulda if his nephew could come to live with them on the Osage reservation. In 1882, eight-year-old Herbert spent eight months there with his aunt, uncle and cousins. For the future President, they were memories that lasted a lifetime.

 

 

Take a Virtual Tour

This is a stop on the virtual tour of Herbert Hoover National Historic Site.

« Garvin House | Leech House »

Did You Know?

A game of Hooverball on the White House lawn.

President Hoover's doctor designed an athletic game to keep him fit. "Hooverball" is similar to volleyball, but scored like tennis. Players heave a six-pound medicine ball over the net. More...