• Halema`uma`u Just Before Dawn

    Hawai'i Volcanoes

    National Park Hawai'i

Puʻu Puaʻi Overlook

Crater Rim Drive Tour - Stop #7
 
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View From Pu‘u Pua‘i Overlook. Can You See the People at the Bottom Right of the Photo? Click on the Photo for full Size Image.
NPS - Ed Shiinoki
 
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The Top of Pu‘u Pua‘i as Seen From the Old Road. To the Right is the Viewing Platform Looking into Kīlauea Iki Crater.

NPS - Ed Shiinoki

The next stop is the Puʻu Puaʻi Overlook. On most days, the strong trade winds make it easy to see how the cone was built during the high lava fountaining in 1959. Notice parts of the old road are buried under Puʻu Puaʻi. (Road rebuilding and rerouting is a fact of life here at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park.)

Close to Kīlauea Ikiʻs fon>untaining, the lava pumice cinders were hot enough to weld themselves together into a spatter cone, Puʻu Puaʻi. Puʻu Puaʻi means gushing hill. Further downwind, the falling cinders had cooled sufficiently to form a blanket of cinders.

The Pu'u Pua'i overlook area is also the upper trailhead for Devastation Trail, which provides a full view of the spatter cone.

 
 

Did You Know?

Green Sea Turtle resting on a beach.

The endangered Honu (Green Sea Turtle) are frequently seen in shallow waters and basking in the sun on beaches. They return to the Northwest Hawaiian Islands to lay their nests, over 700 miles away.