• Halema`uma`u Just Before Dawn

    Hawai'i Volcanoes

    National Park Hawai'i

After Dark in the Park Video Archives - Jan 26 2010

January 26, 2010 – "The Volcanologist's Toolkit: How Volcanoes are Monitored"

Volcano studies are carried out among four disciplines: geology, seismology, geophysics and geochemistry. Scientists from each of these disciplines use a variety of techniques and instruments to monitor active volcanoes. For example, geologists map lava flows and assess hazards, seismologists study earthquakes, geophysicists use GPS to track ground movements, and geochemists study gases to characterize magma depth and volume. Together, these techniques comprise a toolkit to better understand a volcano's hazards and activity. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcanologist Mike Poland explores the many tools used to monitor active volcanoes, and how applying multiple tools can lead to entirely new insights into how Hawaiian volcanoes work.

 
Length 00:58:54
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Did You Know?

`a`a flowing over an older flow of pahoehoe.

The two types of Hawaiian lava differ in appearance but are chemically alike. Pahoehoe has a smoother and ropey surface where a`a is jagged and clinkery.