• Halema`uma`u Just Before Dawn

    Hawai'i Volcanoes

    National Park Hawai'i

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park October 2013 Hawaiian Cultural & After Dark in the Park Programs

Dr. Wes Thelen, USGS HVO seismologist
USGS HVO Seismologist, Dr. Wes Thelen
USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

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News Release Date: September 24, 2013
Contact: Jessica Ferracane, 808-985-6018

Hawaii National Park, Hawai'i – Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in October. All programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai'i Pacific Parks Association, and your $2 donation helps support park programs.  Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Large Earthquakes in the Hawaiian Islands: What You Need to Know
The island of Hawai'i has a long history of damaging, deadly, and costly earthquakes.  But did you know that large earthquakes are an ever-present danger throughout the state of Hawai'i? And do you know what to do to protect yourself during the next big earthquake? Weston Thelen, a seismologist with the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, will present an overview of damaging earthquakes in Hawai'i, including current theories on why they occur, and what you need to know about future large earthquakes. He will also talk about Hawai'i's first Great ShakeOut, an earthquake drill that will take place on October 17, and how you can join in on the global effort to increase awareness of earthquake hazards and how to minimize their risks. Part of Hawai'i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Oct. 1 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

 
‘Ohe kapala

‘Ohe kapala used to decorate kapa cloth

NPS Photo/Jay Robinson

'Ohe Kapala (Bamboo Stamp). 'Ohe kapala, or stamps made from bamboo, were used to create unique designs for traditional kapa. Today, these exceptional designs are used as patterns on all types of fabric. Join Keiki Mercado and Nikki Kiakona as they demonstrate how 'ohe (bamboo) is carved into beautiful designs and how they are used. There will be samples and a hands-on opportunity to learn about this distinctive art form. Part of Hawai'i Volcanoes' ongoing 'Ike Hana No'eau "Experience the Skillful Work" workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Oct. 9 from 10 a.m. to noon
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

 
Ben Ka‘ili

Ben Ka'ili in Concert. Hawaiian musician Ben Ka'ili has dedicated his life to playing and promoting Hawaiian music. He has shared Hawaiian music at festivals, including Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park's 33rd annual cultural festival last July, and through concerts and performances for more than 20 years. orn on the island of Hawai'i, Ka'ili started playing Hawaiian music at the age of eight with his family, including his uncle, Uncle George Lanakilakeikiahiali'i Na'ope. Part of Hawai'i Volcanoes' ongoing Nā Leo Manu "Heavenly Voices" presentations. Free.
When: Wed., Oct. 16 from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

 
hau bloom

Hau in bloom

Courtesy photo

The Art of Hau. Learn the art of making cord and rope with hau, an indigenous plant in the hibiscus family. Malia Macabio and Kanoe Awong share the intricacies of gathering the material, preparing it, and braiding the fibers into useful and important pieces of Hawaiian art. Part of Hawai'i Volcanoes' ongoing 'Ike Hana No'eau "Experience the Skillful Work" workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Oct. 23 from 10 a.m. to noon
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

 
Aunty Doreen Henderson

Aunty Doreen Henderson

Courtesy photo

Puna Junior Ranger Day. Keiki of all ages are invited to join park rangers and master lei hulu kumu, Aunty Doreen Henderson, for a hands-on demonstration and workshop on how to make kāhili, the Hawaiian feather standard. At least one adult must accompany the children. Sign up for this free program, which includes a free lunch. Registration is required. Call (808) 985-6011. Co-sponsored by Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park, Hawai'i Pacific Parks Association, and the Queen Lili'uokalani Children's Center.
When: Sat., Oct. 26 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Where: Maku'u Farmer's Market in Puna

 
Ohia_book_cover

Rainforest: Born Among Hawaiian Volcanoes, Evolved in Isolation: The Story of a Dynamic Ecosystem with Relevance to Forests Worldwide, by University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa professor Dieter Mueller-Dombois

Courtesy photo

Examining the 'Ōhi'a Lehua Ecosystem with Dr. Dieter Mueller-Dombois. In the early 1970s, a multidisciplinary team of forest biologists began a study of the intact native ecosystems in and around Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park, in particular the 'ōhi'a lehua rainforest. Patches of dead 'ōhi'a stands were reported from the windward slopes of Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea. Aerial photo analyses by a team of federal and state foresters revealed rapidly spreading 'ōhi'a dieback. A killer disease was suspected to destroy the Hawaiian rain forest in the next 15-25 years, yet that never happened. In his new book, Rainforest: Born Among Hawaiian Volcanoes, Evolved in Isolation: The Story of a Dynamic Ecosystem with Relevance to Forests Worldwide, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa professor Dieter Mueller-Dombois explains what really happened and why the 'ōhi'a lehua rainforest survived intact as witnessed today. Part of Hawai'i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Oct. 29 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

-NPS-

Did You Know?

`iliahi is the Hawaiian name for sandalwood.

During the 1800's, vast quantities of fragrant sandalwood were the first major export of the Hawaiian Islands. The trade nearly caused the extinction of `iliahi or sandalwood (Santalum paniculatum).