• Halema`uma`u Just Before Dawn

    Hawai'i Volcanoes

    National Park Hawai'i

Hawaiian Cultural & After Dark in the Park Programs February 2014

Mike Poland USGS HVO scientist
USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientist Mike Poland
Photo Courtesy of USGS HVO

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
News Release Date: January 21, 2014
Contact: Jessica Ferracane, 808-985-6018

Hawaii National Park, Hawai'i – Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in February. All programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai'i Pacific Parks Association, and your $2 donation helps support park programs.  Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

What We Don't Know About Hawaiian Volcanoes. For all that scientists have learned about Hawaiian volcanoes during the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory's first 100 years, there are still questions to be answered. James Dwight Dana, one of the first geologists to study Hawaiian volcanoes, called these unknowns "points requiring elucidation" in his book, Characteristics of Volcanoes, in 1890.  In the years since, many of Dana's points have been addressed, but some have not.  A number of new questions have also arisen, thanks to years of continuous observation and study of Kīlauea, Mauna Loa, and other Hawaiian volcanoes.  USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientist Mike Poland will discuss the big issues faced by volcanologists studying Hawai'i's volcanoes today, from the source of magma deep within the Earth to predicting eruptions—or determining when an ongoing eruption will end! Part of Hawai'i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Feb. 4, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium  

Up in Arms! The Struggle to Preserve the Legacy of the National Park Service During Wartime. Park archeologist Jadelyn Moniz-Nakamura shares a revealing and fascinating presentation of the challenges faced by the National Park Service before, during, and after World War II at Kīlauea, in what was then called Hawai'i National Park. The findings of Moniz-Nakamura's extensive research were recently published in The Hawaiian Journal of History, Vol. 47 (2013). Part of Hawai'i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Feb. 11, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium  

Kalo Demonstration. Join Sam and Edna Buldado as they share the cultural uses of the kalo (taro) plant. Kalo is used for many things, including food, medicine, glue, and dyes – making it one of the most important plants in all of Hawai'i. Part of Hawai'i Volcanoes' ongoing 'Ike Hana No'eau "Experience the Skillful Work" workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Feb. 12, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai 

Russell Mauga in Concert. Enjoy an evening of contemporary Hawaiian music through the vibrant voice and slack-key guitar styling of Russell Mauga, one of Hawai'i Island's top entertainers. art of Hawai'i Volcanoes' ongoing Nā Leo Manu "Heavenly Voices" presentations. Free.
When: Wed., Feb. 19, from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Lei Hulu a me Ulana Pāpale Lauhala. Join master lei maker Kilohana Domingo as he demonstrates the intricate art of lei hulu, or feather lei making. His mother, Lehua Domingo, will share the detailed 'anoni style of weaving pandanus leaves into an exquisite pāpale, or hat. Both lei hulu and pāpale will be on display. Part of Hawai'i Volcanoes' ongoing 'Ike Hana No'eau "Experience the Skillful Work" workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Feb. 26, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai.

Did You Know?

Green Sea Turtle resting on a beach.

The endangered Honu (Green Sea Turtle) are frequently seen in shallow waters and basking in the sun on beaches. They return to the Northwest Hawaiian Islands to lay their nests, over 700 miles away.