• Halema`uma`u Just Before Dawn

    Hawai'i Volcanoes

    National Park Hawai'i

Picture Yourself at Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park During National Park Week, April 21-29!

Halema'uma'u
Halema'uma'u
Photo Credit - Jay Robinson

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News Release Date: April 13, 2012
Contact: Jessica Ferracane, 808-985-6018

Entrance Fees Waived all Nine Days

Hawaii National Park, Hawai'i - Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park invites everyone to "Picture Yourself" at the park April 21-29. Hawai'i Volcanoes will join national parks across the country in waiving entrance fees all nine days during National Park Week.

This year's theme, "Picture Yourself in a National Park," encourages visitors to share photos or videos of themselves, their families and friends exploring and enjoying the park during National Park Week on the park's Facebook page, http://www.facebook.com/hawaiivolcanoes.

Hawai'i Volcanoes will offer ranger-led hikes and other programs during National Park Week, including a challenging hike into Kīpuka'akihi in Kahuku Apr. 21 (registration required, call 985-6011), and a special After Dark in the Park program Apr. 24 about the park's endemic flowering plants. More information can be found at http://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/events.htm. Be sure to  check the ranger activities bulletin board at the Kīlauea Visitor Center each morning at 9 a.m.

The National Park Service will waive entrance fees again on June 9 (Get Outdoors Day), July 14 (Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park's 32nd Annual Cultural Festival), Sept. 29 (National Public Lands Day) and Nov. 10-12 (Veteran's Day weekend).

Hawai'i Volcanoes is one of five national park units on Hawai'i Island. Pu'uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park is also free of charge on the NPS fee-free 2012 dates. There is no admission at Pu'ukoholā Heiau National Historic Site, Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park, or along the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail.

-NPS-

Did You Know?

Hokulea - Kamehameha Schools Archives

Polynesians from distant lands came to the shores of Hawai‘i over a thousand years ago. Sailing on large, double-hulled canoes, they navigated by using the position of the stars, the sun and the moon, by the movement of the waves and by the flight of the birds.