• Halema`uma`u Just Before Dawn

    Hawai'i Volcanoes

    National Park Hawai'i

Plan A Field Trip

Ranger-led, grade level curriculum-based programs for school groups visiting Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park focus on geology, forest ecology, and Hawaiian culture. The programs are designed to help teachers meet State of Hawai'i curriculum requirements. Our goal is to provide students with field experience as a supplement to classroom learning through ranger-guided hikes and environmental programs.

  • Arrange for a school program by submitting a Program Request Form at least three months prior to your visit.
  • We require one chaperone for every ten students. Chaperones must provide for the safety of students in their care.
  • Minimum group size is 15 students, maximum size is 60 students and no more than 10 chaperones. Ranger-led programs are conducted at 9:30 a.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays.
  • Groups larger than 70 may request a ranger orientation talk and film in the Kīlauea Visitor Center auditorium. A 25-minute orientation film is shown daily in the visitor center every hour on-the-hour throughout the day from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The auditorium seats 200 and all programs are open to the public.
  • Request an Educational Fee Waiver
  • Prepare Ahead: Weather in the park is unpredictable. Come prepared with rain gear, sturdy walking shoes, hat, sunscreen, water, and warm clothing for each person in your group.
  • Location: Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park is located on Highway 11, 28 miles south of Hilo which is a 45 minute drive.
  • Health Hazards: Visitors with asthma, heart, or lung conditions should be aware that there may be high levels of volcanic sulfur fumes at times in the park which may aggravate or induce severe medical conditions.


Because of the dynamic nature of the volcanoes in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park (e.g. eruptions, earthquakes, tsunami and fires etc.), programs may be cancelled without notice.

We look forward to your visit!

Did You Know?

Hokulea - Kamehameha Schools Archives

Polynesians from distant lands came to the shores of Hawai‘i over a thousand years ago. Sailing on large, double-hulled canoes, they navigated by using the position of the stars, the sun and the moon, by the movement of the waves and by the flight of the birds.