• Horse and Carriage in front of Hampton NHS

    Hampton

    National Historic Site Maryland

Historic Garden Addition

Reproduction urn placed in historic falling garden at Hampton NHS.
Reproduction of c.1812 Tatham Tazza Urn
Paul Bitzel

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News Release Date: May 12, 2011

An important element of the Falling Garden has been restored in the landscape at Hampton National Historic Site in Towson, Maryland. As part of the ongoing rehabilitation of the garden, a reproduction cast stone urn and pedestal were placed as the central feature of Parterre I (the left garden as seen from the Great Terrace) where one had been located historically. The design of the urn dates from c1812 and is known at the Tatham Tazza after Charles Heathcote Tatham (1772-1842), an architect of considerable repute who studied in Italy. This precise replica faithfully duplicates the original Coade design down to the date stamp "Coade & Sealy 1812". As part of the garden rehabilitation, a variegated century plant, Agave americana medio-picta, will be planted in the urn based upon historical documentation.

The Tatham Tazza urn was provided through a memorial donation made to park by the Women's Committee of Historic Hampton, Inc. to honor Mrs. Phyllis Meyers, Chair of the Women's Committee, avid gardener, and enormous supporter of Hampton National Historic Site.

Hampton NHS, a unit of the National Park Service is responsible for preserving and interpreting the cultural and natural history of a once vast industrial and agricultural estate. For more information about visiting the site visit www.nps.gov/hamp or call 410-823-1309x251.

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Did You Know?

A Slave with a Wheelbarrow of Firewood

The Ridgelys owned as many as 350 slaves at Hampton who worked in the ironworks, the fields, and the mansion. Some slaves stayed at Hampton even after the Civil War but many ran away.