• Horse and Carriage in front of Hampton NHS

    Hampton

    National Historic Site Maryland

Significant Ridgely Collections at other Maryland repositories

Maryland Historical Society (MDHS)

Collection Name

Call Number

Ridgely Account Books, 1732-1884

MS 691

Ridgely Papers, 1664-1882

[Microfilm available at MSA, see below]

MS 692

Ridgely Papers, 1733-1817

MS 692.1

Ridgely-Pue Papers, 1748-1932

MS 693

Helen West Stewart Ridgely Papers, 1868-1919

MS 715

Helen West Stewart Ridgely Family Papers, 1840-1918

MS 715.1

Ridgely-Stewart Papers, 1773-1921

MS 716

Ridgely-Dorsey Papers, 1733-1885

MS 717

Scrapbook, 1875-1912

MS 954

John Campbell White Papers, 1772-1926

MS 1005

John Campbell White Papers, 1764-1928

MS 1005.2

Ridgely Family Papers, 1757-1929

[Microfilm available at MSA, see below]

MS 1127

Henry White Papers, 1803-1887

MS 1461

Chew-Ridgely Papers, 1720-1841

MS 1620

Ridgely Papers, 1840-1919

MS 1908

Buckler Family Papers, 1775-1938

MS 2786

Hoyt Collection of Ridgely Papers, 1716-1971

MS 2891


For information on how to access collections at the Maryland Historical Society's H. Furlong Baldwin Library, click here.

 

Maryland State Archives (MSA)

Collection Name

Call Number

The Landholdings of the Ridgelys of Hamptpon, 1726-1843 (dissertation)

MSA 1085

G. Howard White Collection

MSA 1898

Ridgely Family Papers [MS 692 at MDHS]

MSA 3944

Ridgely Family Papers [MS 1127 at MDHS]

MSA 3945

Charles Ridgely and Company Collection

MSA 4580


Click here to go directly to the MSA Special Collections page.

Notes: The Maryland State Archives also holds many Government Records related to the Ridgely family and Hampton which have not been fully analyzed.

See also “Beneath the Underground, Flight to Freedom – Ridgely Compound of Hampton”.

Visit Getting Started at the Archives to learn more about doing research at the Maryland State Archives.

Did You Know?

A Slave with a Wheelbarrow of Firewood

The Ridgelys owned as many as 350 slaves at Hampton who worked in the ironworks, the fields, and the mansion. Some slaves stayed at Hampton even after the Civil War but many ran away.