• A view of the cinder desert

    Haleakalā

    National Park Hawai'i

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • No Potable Water Available in Kipahulu

    Due to a leak in the main waterline in Kīpahulu there is no potable water in Kīpahulu for the foreseeable future. The leak was discovered on July 23, 2014 during routine inspections. Visitors should bring their own drinking water.

  • For your safety

    The Summit and Kīpahulu Districts are remote. An ambulance can take up to 45 minutes to arrive at either district from the nearest town. People with respiratory or other medical conditions should also be aware that the summit of Haleakalā is at 10,000 ft.

  • Drive cautiously - Endangered birds land on roadway

    Nēnē (Hawaiian geese) are nesting in the park and may land on or frequent park roads and parking lots. Drivers are reminded to drive at the posted speed limits and exercise caution.

Wind, Wings, and Waves

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Across vast expanses of ocean, life eventually came to the barren volcanic islands in the form of seeds, spores, insects, spiders, birds, and small plants.

 
They drifted on the wind, floated on the ocean currents or hitched a ride on migrating or storm-driven birds. Many groups of organisms (amphibians, reptiles, social insects, and almost all land mammals) were unable to make the long journey, while some arrived but did not survive in their new home. It is estimated that an average of only one species every 35,000 years successfully colonized the islands.

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

The Wilderness Area of Haleakalā National Park was designated on October 20, 1976 with 19,270 acres. This protected Wilderness expanded to 24,719 acres in 2005.