• A view of the cinder desert

    Haleakalā

    National Park Hawai'i

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • No Potable Water Available in Kipahulu

    Due to a leak in the main waterline in Kīpahulu there is no potable water in Kīpahulu for the foreseeable future. The leak was discovered on July 23, 2014 during routine inspections. Visitors should bring their own drinking water.

  • For your safety

    The Summit and Kīpahulu Districts are remote. An ambulance can take up to 45 minutes to arrive at either district from the nearest town. People with respiratory or other medical conditions should also be aware that the summit of Haleakalā is at 10,000 ft.

  • Drive cautiously - Endangered birds land on roadway

    Nēnē (Hawaiian geese) are nesting in the park and may land on or frequent park roads and parking lots. Drivers are reminded to drive at the posted speed limits and exercise caution.

Preservation

Visitor Impacts

Documentation of visitor created memorial, before removal by NPS staff

NPS Photo

Even if it doesn’t appear so, Haleakalā is a fragile landscape. It is home to a variety of plant and animal species found nowhere else in the world and includes a number of significant cultural sites.

Without meaning to do harm, many visitors feel the need to stack rocks, leave memorials (e.g., crosses, lei, photographs), carve their names on things, go off-trail exploring, or otherwise disturb places they visit here at Haleakalā National Park. These actions have a variety of negative effects such as damaging plant and animal habitat, creating marks that remain visible for years, and causing soil and cinder erosion. It is also disrespectful towards Native Hawaiian culture and other visitor’s and future visitor’s enjoyment of the park.

Many of the areas that visitors accidentally disturb contain archeological resources. Collecting artifacts or disturbing archeological materials in general, limits our ability to learn more about the past. Determining the provenience (that is, the precise location) of artifacts and other archeological materials is critical to archeologists being able to understand and interpret the culture which created the artifact or site. If you find an artifact or other archeological materials, leave it in place and report the discovery to park staff or contact the Park Archeologist at ph# (808) 572-4424.

Federal law prohibits the excavation, removal, damage, alteration or defacement of an archeological resource in Haleakalā National Park, without a valid permit. The Archeological Resources Protection Act (ARPA) of 1979 was enacted to secure for the present and future benefits of the American people, the protection of archeological resources on public and Indian lands. Prohibited activities can result in large fines and jail time for violators.

Enjoy Haleakalā National Park respectfully. Do not stack rocks, leave memorials or otherwise deface resources. Please stay on trail. Mahalo!

 
Visitor Impacts
Visitor stacked rocks at White Hill
NPS Photo

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

The Wilderness Area of Haleakalā National Park was designated on October 20, 1976 with 19,270 acres. This protected Wilderness expanded to 24,719 acres in 2005.