• View of the Monument across the Snake River

    Hagerman Fossil Beds

    National Monument Idaho

Fish

Upclose view of fish vertebrae

Fossilized Fish Vertebrae

NPS

The aquatic ecosystem is inextricably linked, through the riparian zone, with the terrestrial ecosystem. Species of fish in this stretch of the Snake River include rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), small-mouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui), chub (Couesius plumbeus), suckers (Catostomus spp.), and non-native carp (Cyprinus carpio). Sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus), although once plentiful, are now rare.

Much of the Snake River and many of its reaches have been declared as critical habitat for the Snake River sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), a federally listed endangered species, and the Snake River fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha), a federally listed threatened species. In addition, the entire Snake River Basin has been designated as an Evolutionary Significant Unit for the West Coast steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

The Bull Trout (Salvelinus confluentus) from the Columbia River population within the Columbia River Basin is listed as threatened. The monument site lies adjacent to the Snake River, which is part of the tributary system of the Columbia River.

Did You Know?

View of Melon Gravels found in fields and along the roads in Hagerman

The catastrophic Bonneville Flood thundered through the Hagerman Valley 15,000 years ago leaving behind enormous fields of rounded lava boulders – some as big as cars. They are called ‘melon gravel’ and can still be seen throughout the valley today.