• Sun beginning to set at Harpers Ferry, as seen from Maryland Heights. Photo by NPS Volunteer Buddy Secor.

    Harpers Ferry

    National Historical Park WV,VA,MD

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  • Temporary Suspension of Reference Collection Research

    Due to the park archives and research room/library space move, new public research requests will not be filled until at least June 30th, 2014.

  • Change in Park Hours

    The park is currently open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. with the last shuttle bus departing Lower Town at 6:45 p.m. More »

Event Details

  • Multiple Days: 03/09/2013, 04/06/2013

    Location: Lower Town, Harpers Ferry Time: 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM,2:00 PM to 4:00 PM Fee Information: Park Entrance Fee: $10.00 per vehicle for 3 days or $5.00 per person on foot or bicycle. Additional workshop fee. Contact Name: Melinda Day Contact Email: e-mail us Contact Phone Number: 304-535-6063

The public is invited to register for a special 2-hour historic trades pie baking workshop on Saturday, March 9, at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. Two sessions are offered: 11 am-1 pm and 2-4 pm. Step into Mr. and Mrs. Roeder's 1860 Confectionery on pie baking day. Learn to bake the "new way" in a wood burning stove.

Return to the era before the Civil War when a shift began from locally raised organic foods to more expensive processed tin canned foods. Enjoy a slice of hot fruit pie that you've made. Learn how the industrial revolution made your pie possible, how the ingredients made their way to your table, from field to factory, and which town citizens would have experienced financial hardship to afford this new- fangled marvel.

Long before the arrival of English Settlers, Native Americans had cultivated small crab apples. The English arrived on American soil with their favorite apple varieties and a tradition of pie making. By the 1850's, the Victorian consumer had a choice of over 1,000 apple varieties from around the world. Along came coal powered steam trains that provided a new fast way to move apples from one state to the next. Trains allowed the whole character and composition of American orchard apples to change from locally grown varieties to apples that could survive being jostled by train travel over hundreds of miles. At its 19th Century height of popularity, American agriculture offered bakers like Mr. Roeder specialty apples for numerous end uses such as pies, hard cider, cakes and puddings.

Date /Time: March 9, 2013, 11 am to 1 pm; and 2 pm-4 pm.

Number of students and Cost: Workshop Fee: $20 per adult covers instruction, wood stove fire management techniques, samples of heirloom, local back bred, 19th century apples, and baking ingredients.

Class Size: Limited to 6 participants per class.
To Register: This workshop requires registration with the Harpers Ferry Historical Association at: 304-

535-6881 or at the bookshop webpage http://harpersferryhistory.org.

About the Instructor: Susan Journell, a David Larsen Memorial Fund partner, is a Public Historian and Park Foodways Expert. For 20 years, Susan has offered living history foodway demonstration opportunities to park visitors to care about the park's nationally significant theme stories.