• Sun beginning to set at Harpers Ferry, as seen from Maryland Heights. Photo by NPS Volunteer Buddy Secor.

    Harpers Ferry

    National Historical Park WV,VA,MD

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Shepherdstown Battlefield Special Resource Study/Environmental Assessment

 

National Park Service Seeks Public Comment on the Shepherdstown Battlefield Special Resource Study/Environmental Assessment

Washington D.C. - The National Park Service (NPS) is conducting a special resource study of Shepherdstown Battlefield in West Virginia and Maryland, located near the town of Shepherdstown, West Virginia. As part of the study, the NPS will hold two Public Meetings to explain the history and the study process of the two-day Shepherdstown battle and provide an opportunity for public comment. These informational meetings will be held in an open house format. The dates, times, and locations of the two meetings are listed below:

Thursday, February 23, 2012
4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Stephen T. Mather Training Center
Harpers Ferry, WV

Saturday, February 25, 2012
10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Clarion Hotel, 233 Lowe Drive
Shepherdstown, WV 25443

Historian Thomas McGrath, author ofShepherdstown: Last Clash of the Antietam Campaign, September 19-20, 1862, will present research on the events that occurred during the two-day Shepherdstown battle. For directions and details about the meetings and study, or in case of rescheduling due to bad weather, please go to www.parkplanning.nps.gov/SHBA.

Congress directed the NPS to complete this special resource study on Shepherdstown Battlefield in order to assess the potential of its inclusion within the national park system (as an addition to Harpers Ferry National Historical Park or Antietam National Battlefield). The special resource study will evaluate the battlefield based upon the battle's significance to U.S. history and whether the NPS should manage the area for resource preservation and public use. The study will also assess public support and alternative strategies to NPS ownership and management. The findings of the study will be reported to Congress, who will make the final decision whether or not it will be included in the national park system.

"Public input is the key to studying additions to the national park system. We look forward to hearing from community members and other stakeholders" said David Hayes, NPS Regional Planner.

The 30-day public comment period will take place from February 13 to March 13, 2012, to solicit public comments on this proposed study. During this period, the public is invited to identify concerns they may have with the proposed study verbally or in writing at the public open houses. Written comments can be submitted electronically at the NPS's Planning, Environment, and Public Comment (PEPC) website at www.parkplanning.nps.gov/SHBA or by mail to:

Regional Director, National Capital Region
Attn: David Hayes
National Park Service
1100 Ohio Drive, SW
Washington, DC 20242

Written comments must be postmarked by March 13, 2012, to receive consideration.

Before including a personal address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal identifying information in a written comment, any one providing written comment should be aware their entire comment-including their personal identifying information-may be made publicly available at any time. While anyone wishing to comment may ask the NPS in their comment to withhold their personal identifying information from public review, the NPS cannot guarantee it will be able to do so.

Did You Know?

Intake arches channeled water to power industry on Virginius Island.

Virginius Island was a thriving 19th-century industrial town along the Shenandoah River. By 1859, there were about three dozen buildings there.