• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

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  • Bears are active in Grand Teton

    Black and grizzly bears are roaming throughout the park--near roads, trails and in backcountry areas. Hikers and backcountry users are advised to travel in groups of three or more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay 100 yards from bears. More »

  • Area closure in the area around Baxter's Pinnacle

    An area closure is in effect around Baxter's Pinnacle to protect nesting peregrine falcons. This closure precludes any climbs of Baxter's Pinnacle and usage of the walk-off gully. This closure will be in effect through 8-15-2013. More »

Moose District Trip Planner

Taggart Lake and Grand Teton

Taggart Lake with a view of the Grand Teton, Mt. Owen and Mt. Teewinot

NPS Photo

Explore the Moose District in the southern part of Grand Teton National Park, 12 miles north of Jackson, Wyoming. Enjoy a variety of trails, activities, scenic drives and ranger programs as well as unique historic districts and iconic views of the Teton Range. Visit the Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center for trip planning information and informative displays; Menor's Ferry Historic District and Mormon Row for a glimpse into the past; and the Murie Ranch for wilderness inspiration. Hike to Taggart, Bradley and Phelps lakes for mountain reflections or into Death Canyon to reach the alpine backcountry. Drive scenic roads looking for bison, moose, pronghorn, historic homesteads and even a monumental landslide. For a cozy evening of camping, pitch your tent or park your RV at the Gros Ventre Campground. The Moose area remains open year-round.

Click on links below for additional information:

Moose area map

Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center

Moose District FAQs

Moose District activities

Moose District trails

Moose District facilities

Did You Know?

Pika with a mouth full of grass

Did you know that pikas harvest grasses so they can survive the long cold winter? These small members of the rabbit family do not hibernate, but instead store their harvest as “haystacks” under rocks in the alpine environment.