• Moose cow and calf

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

Schneckenburger Elementary School Podcasts

The podcasts below are brought to you by the Fifth Grade students at Schneckenburger Elementary from the Jefferson Parish Public School System in Louisiana. These podcasts were developed in partnership with Grand Teton National Park Rangers in the Division of Interpretation. If you think a project like this would be a fun thing to do in your school, let your teacher know!

New for 2011: The Schneckenburger Elementary students have created slideshows with narration. Learn about bighorn sheep, cougars, coyotes, marmots, pikas, and wolverines. more>>

 
close-up of bison in grass

Copyright: Dan Ng Photograph

BISON (Bison bison)

Click here to learn about bison, the largest animal found in Grand Teton National Park, through the voices of the Schneckenburger Elementary School students.

 
Black bear standing on a fence post

BLACK BEAR (Ursus americanus)

Click here to learn about black bears in Grand Teton National Park through the voices of the Schneckenburger Elementary School students. There are more than 100 black bears in the park.

 
Two gray wolves run in the snow

GRAY WOLVES (Canis lupus)

Click here to learn about gray wolves in Grand Teton National Park through the voices of the Schneckenburger Elementary School students. Wolves were re-introduced into Yellowstone National Park. Some of these wolves came to Grand Teton National Park, forming new wolf packs.
 
A grizzly bear walks through snow.

GRIZZLY BEARS (Ursus arctos horribilis)

Click here to learn about grizzly bears in Grand Teton National Park through the voices of the Schneckenburger Elementary School students. Grizzly bears were once only found in the northern part of the park. Now they roam throughout the park.

 
Close-up photo of a bull moose with full rack.

MOOSE (Alces alces)

Click here to learn about moose in Grand Teton National Park through the voices of the Schneckenburger Elementary School students. Have you ever heard of a mangy moose? Moose look very mangy during the spring because they are shedding their winter coats.

 
A pronghorn stands in fall grass

PRONGHORN (Antilocapra americana)

Click here to learn about pronghorn in Grand Teton National Park through the voices of the Schneckenburger Elementary School students. The pronghorn is the fastest land mammal in North America. The pronghorn who summer in the park have the second longest migration route of any land animal in North America.

Did You Know?

Uinta Ground Squirrel

Did you know that Uinta ground squirrels, sometimes mistaken for prairie dogs, hibernate up to eight months a year? These animals leave their burrows in March or April to inhabit the sagebrush flats, but may return by the end of July.