• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Bears are active in Grand Teton

    Black and grizzly bears are roaming throughout the park--near roads, trails and in backcountry areas. Hikers and backcountry users are advised to travel in groups of three or more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay 100 yards from bears. More »

  • Moose-Wilson Road Closure

    The Moose-Wilson Road between Death Canyon Junction north to the intersection with the Murie Center Road is temporarily closed to motor vehicles, bicycles, skating, skateboards and similar devices. For current road conditions call 307-739-3682. More »

  • Pathway Closure

    The Multi-use Pathway will be closed from the Gros Ventre Bridge to the Snake River Bridge starting on September 15, 2014 due to construction. Construction on this section of pathway is expected to be completed by October 13, 2014.

Park Newspaper

Our park newspaper, the Grand Teton Guide, provides visitors with a wealth of information about park activities, lodging, services and other important notices. Each vehicle entering through the park's entrance booths will receive one newspaper, or you may download the latest Grand Teton Guide here. For park newspaper's from previous years, you may view them here.You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader 5.0 or higher to view these files. Go to the Adobe web site.

2014
Fall 2014 (September 2 - October 31), 4.4 Mb
Summer 2014 (June 4 - September 1), 5.2 Mb
Spring 2014 (May 1 - June 3), 1.7 Mb
Winter 2014 (November 1, 2013 - April 30, 2014), 1.3 Mb

2013
Fall 2013 (September 3 - October 31), 4.4 Mb
Summer 2013 (June 10 - September 2), 5.3 Mb
Spring 2013 (May 1 - June 9), 2.0 Mb
Winter 2013 (November 1, 2012 - April 30, 2013), 1.2 Mb

Did You Know?

Mt. Moran in July

Did you know that the black stripe, or dike, on the face of Mount Moran is 150 feet wide and extends six or seven miles westward? The black dike was once molten magma that squeezed into a crack when the rocks were deep underground, and has since been lifted skyward by movement on the Teton fault.