• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

There are park alerts in effect.
show Alerts »
  • Bears are active in Grand Teton

    Black and grizzly bears are roaming throughout the park--near roads, trails and in backcountry areas. Hikers and backcountry users are advised to travel in groups of three or more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay 100 yards from bears. More »

  • Moose-Wilson Road Closure

    The Moose-Wilson Road between Death Canyon Junction north to the intersection with the Murie Center Road is temporarily closed to motor vehicles, bicycles, skating, skateboards and similar devices. For current road conditions call 307-739-3682. More »

  • Pathway Closure

    The Multi-use Pathway will be closed from the Gros Ventre Bridge to the Snake River Bridge starting on September 15, 2014 due to construction. Construction on this section of pathway is expected to be completed by October 13, 2014.

Grand Teton to Host Distinguished Geologist Bob Smith

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
Date: June 29, 2012
Contact: Public Affairs Office, 307.739.3431

Grand Teton National Park welcomes Dr. Bob Smith, distinguished scholar and professor emeritus of geology and geophysics at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, to the Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center auditorium at 6:30 p.m. on Friday evening, July 6 for a new special program on geologic forces in Grand Teton and Yellowstone national parks. Smith's presentation titled, Shaky Tetons and Breathing Yellowstone, will provide a window into the Yellowstone Hotspot and Teton Fault with new materials and demonstrations. 

The presentation will cover the Yellowstone hotspot and mantle plume; subsurface geology and earthquakes of Jackson Hole; Yellowstone's magma chamber; and the 'real-time pulse' of Yellowstone-Teton geology determined by GPS. Dr. Smith will also describe the newly upgraded Yellowstone earthquake-volcano monitoring network and show how the public can access the University of Utah real-time earthquake data. He will demonstrate the workings of a seismograph that can record earthquakes as small as magnitude -1 and super accurate GPS receiver that can measure ground movement as small as a few millimeters. 

Dr. Smith has made outstanding contributions in the field of geology, specifically in association with Grand Teton and Yellowstone national parks. Smith's lengthy career in studying and interpreting earthquakes, fault zones, and volcanoes-and their impacts on the geologic evolution of northwestern Wyoming-has generated a greater appreciation for, and increased knowledge of, the dynamic forces at work in the physical landscape of the world-renowned Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. 

Smith holds a Ph.D. from the University of Utah and has served as a visiting professor at Columbia University, Cambridge University and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland. His popular book with Lee Siegel, Windows Into the Earth: The Geologic Story of Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks (2000, Oxford University Press) explains the geology of the parks, and he regularly provides 'real-time' feedback to personnel in both parks about seismic events throughout the region to encourage effective response planning to natural geologic hazards. 

The discussion is free and open to the public. Seating is available for the first 150 guests on a first come-first served basis. For further information, please contact the Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center at 307.739.3399.

Did You Know?

Bill Menors Ferry

Did you know that until the 1890s no one had settled on the west bank of the Snake River in the central part of Jackson Hole? William “Bill” Menor built a ferry at Moose to shuttle patrons across the river, the only reliable crossing point between Wilson and Moran.