• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

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  • Bears are active in Grand Teton

    Black and grizzly bears are roaming throughout the park--near roads, trails and in backcountry areas. Hikers and backcountry users are advised to travel in groups of three or more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay 100 yards from bears. More »

  • Area closure in the area around Baxter's Pinnacle

    An area closure is in effect around Baxter's Pinnacle to protect nesting peregrine falcons. This closure precludes any climbs of Baxter's Pinnacle and usage of the walk-off gully. This closure will be in effect through 8-15-2013. More »

Grand Teton National Park & John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway Re-open to Visitors

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Date: October 17, 2013
Contact: Public Affairs Office, 307.739.3393

Grand Teton National Park and the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway are open again after a 16-day closure during a lapse in appropriations. Superintendent Mary Gibson Scott will hold a conference call for news media at 3 p.m. MDT today on the status of opening the parks and the economic impacts of the government closure.

Most park roads are open including the Teton Park Road and Moose-Wilson Road. The Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center in Moose, Wyoming is also open. It may take park staff up to 72-hours to fully restore all visitor services and open facilities, but all trailheads, parking lots and recreational amenities are open and available to visitors.

We are happy to be back at work serving the American people and welcoming visitors to their national parks. The economic impact of closing Grand Teton National Park and the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway for 16 days has been extremely tough on our gateway communities, local businesses, neighbors, and park partners.

News media, please call 877-696-2094 with participant code 875125# for the 3 p.m. call.

Did You Know?

Beaver Dick Leigh and his family.

Did you know that Jenny and Leigh Lakes are named for the fur trapper “Beaver” Dick Leigh and his wife Jenny (not pictured)? Beaver Dick and Jenny assisted the Hayden party that explored the region in 1872. This couple impressed the explorers to the extent that they named the lakes in their honor.