• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

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  • Bears are active in Grand Teton

    Black and grizzly bears are roaming throughout the park--near roads, trails and in backcountry areas. Hikers and backcountry users are advised to travel in groups of three or more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay 100 yards from bears. More »

  • Area closure in effect for trails in the Jenny Lake Area

    A temporary area closure will be in effect for several trails in the Jenny Lake area due to construction activities involving helicopter-assisted transport of heavy material. The closure will last from October 27 through October 30, and possibly longer. More »

  • Multi-use Pathway Closures

    Intermittent closures of the park Multi-use Pathway System will occur through mid-October during asphalt sealing and safety improvement work. Pathway sections will reopen as work is completed. Follow the link for a map and more information. More »

  • Moose-Wilson Road Status

    The Moose-Wilson Road between the Death Canyon Road and the Murie Center Road is currently open to all traffic. The road may re-close at any time due to wildlife activity. For current road conditions call 307-739-3682. More »

Jenny Lake Renewal Plan EA Available for Public Review

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Date: February 11, 2014
Contact: Public Affairs Office, 307.739.3393

Grand Teton National Park Acting Superintendent Kevin Schneider announced today that the Jenny Lake Renewal Plan Environmental Assessment (Jenny Lake Plan/EA) is now available for public review. The Jenny Lake Plan/EA will be open to review for 30 days from February 14 through March 15, 2014.  

The purpose of the Jenny Lake Renewal initiative is to create a master plan that will provide for an improved visitor experience that is both safe and environmentally sensitive, as well as enriched through educational and informational opportunities.  

This plan is needed to address several unfavorable conditions in the Jenny Lake area such as: aging and/or poorly designed trails and walkways that do not meet current trail and accessibility standards; aging and failing bridges in the backcountry;  user-created trails with resource degradation; compacted soils and bare ground in destination locations; limited self-guided interpretation/orientation opportunities; outdated water and wastewater systems; and inadequate restroom facilities in South Jenny Lake area. 

The preferred alternative is broken into two distinct areas:  front-country sites and backcountry locations. The proposed front-country effort would make improvements in the South Jenny Lake developed area, as well as the locations of Jenny Lake overlook and String Lake outlet. The proposed plan would improve visitor circulation throughout the South Jenny Lake developed area and address the need for improved visitor orientation and interpretation. It would also provide accessible trails throughout this complex, provide additional restrooms, and rehabilitate the water and wastewater systems. The proposed backcountry improvements would include rehabilitation of the west boat dock, improvement of the Hidden Falls and Inspiration Point viewing areas, and rehabilitation of the trails connecting these two locations.  

Comments on the Jenny Lake Plan/EA can be submitted online at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/jennylake or in writing to: Grand Teton National Park, Planning Office, P.O. Drawer 170, Moose, WY 83012. Comments submitted via U.S. Postal Service must be postmarked by March 15, 2014. 

Anyone choosing to submit a comment is advised that responses given—including personal identifying information—could be made public at any time. Although persons making comments may request that their personal identifying information be withheld from public access, there is no guarantee that the National Park Service will be able to honor such a request.

Did You Know?

Aspen tree bark close-up

Did you know that the bark on Aspen trees looks green because it contains chlorophyll? Aspen bark is photosynthetic, a process that allows a plant to make energy from the sun, and helps the tree flourish during the short growing season.