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Teton Interagency Fire Employees Receive 2010 Regional Awards

Mack McFarland
Mack McFarland

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News Release Date: May 31, 2011
Contact: Jackie Skaggs, 307.739.3393

May 31, 2011

11-37

On behalf of the National Park Service Intermountain Region (IMR), Grand Teton National Park Superintendent Mary Gibson Scott and Bridger-Teton National Forest Supervisor Jacque Buchanan presented Teton Interagency Fire employees with awards for excellence in fire management. Grand Teton National Park Assistant Fire Management Officer Mack McFarland received the IMR Interagency Fire Management Leadership Award and Martha Williamson, Teton Interagency fire planner, received the IMR Fire Management Achievement Award.

McFarland's leadership award recognizes his exemplary service and dual role for the past three years as a fuels specialist for Grand Teton National Park and as the north zone assistant fire management officer for fuels on the Bridger-Teton National Forest.

"Mack had the vision and skills to effectively work within each agency's constraints and overcome any obstacles to successfully complete fuels treatment projects for both agencies," said IMR Fire Management Officer Michael Davin. "Mack is a great example of a service-first approach that is truly working."

McFarland began working seasonally at Grand Teton in 1990 and became a permanent employee in 1996. During his tenure as the interagency fuels specialist, McFarland managed several large-scale projects: the multi-year Lower Gros Ventre Prescribed Fire and the Buffalo Valley Fuels Environmental Assessment, among others.

"On behalf of the Intermountain Region, I extend our thanks and appreciation to Mack McFarland for his dedication and commitment to the teamwork, integration and cooperation between the Bridger-Teton National Forest and Grand Teton National Park," said IMR Director John Wessels. "His skills in 'leading by example' demonstrates a genuine interagency spirit."

Williamson came to Bridger-Teton National Forest and Grand Teton National Park as the interagency fire planner and fire GIS specialist in 2008. She earned the fire achievement award for her significant GIS support and contributions in training for the IMR Wildland Fire and Aviation Management Program.

"Martha provided invaluable direction in creating hands-on training for National Parks Service fire personnel within the Wildland Fire Decision Support System," said IMR Director John Wessels. "In addition, she participated in and provided direction for our regional fire geo-database. Martha works hard to find practical solutions to fire spatial analysis, risk assessment and solution development to better protect people, firefighters, and natural resources."

The Intermountain Region of the National Park Service spans eight states from Montana to Texas, and includes 92 parks and national historic sites.

Did You Know?

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