• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Seasonal road closures in effect

    Seasonal road closures are in effect for motorized vehicles. The Teton Park Road is closed from the Taggart Lake Trailhead to the Signal Mountain Lodge. The Moose-Wilson Road is closed from the Granite Canyon Trailhead to the Death Canyon Road. More »

  • Avalanche hazards exist in the park

    Avalanche hazards exist in the park, especially in mountain canyons and on exposed slopes. A daily avalanche forecast can be found at www.jhavalanche.org or by calling (307) 733-2664. More »

  • Bears emerging from hibernation

    Bears are beginning to emerge from hibernation. Travel in groups of three of more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay at least 100 yards from bears. More »

Prescribed Fire

Fire is linked to the health and diversity of Grand Teton National Park's landscape. The fire-adapted ecosystem depends on this periodic natural disturbance to return areas to earlier successional stages and provide a variety of food sources and habitat for wildlife. Fire can increase forest and vegetation productivity and reduce disease and insect infestation.

The National Park Service uses prescribed fire as an important management tool to help restore natural fire regimes to parklands. Prescribed fire is the carefully planned periodic burning of selected sites to meet a variety of park management objectives. Goals are varied and often overlap. A fire that improves wildlife habitat may, at the same time, decrease accumulated fuels and provide defensible space near developed and high-use park areas.

Before a prescribed fire is ignited, a burn plan is written, reviewed, and approved. Here, the objectives of the burn are listed, along with a description of the project size, the types of fuels to be treated, and the environmental conditions under which it will burn. Through this planning process and the use of fire effects data, fire managers can, in a cost effective manner, reduce hazards and maintain a healthy, balanced ecosystem for future generations.

Fire Management Home

Did You Know?

Banded gneiss

Did you know that the granite and gneiss composing the core of the Teton Range are some of the oldest rocks in North America, but the mountains are among the youngest in the world?