• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Seasonal road closures in effect

    Seasonal road closures are in effect for motorized vehicles. The Teton Park Road is closed from the Taggart Lake Trailhead to the Signal Mountain Lodge. The Moose-Wilson Road is closed from the Granite Canyon Trailhead to the Death Canyon Road. More »

  • Avalanche hazards exist in the park

    Avalanche hazards exist in the park, especially in mountain canyons and on exposed slopes. A daily avalanche forecast can be found at www.jhavalanche.org or by calling (307) 733-2664. More »

  • Bears emerging from hibernation

    Bears are beginning to emerge from hibernation. Travel in groups of three of more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay at least 100 yards from bears. More »

Fire Prevention

Fire is a natural way to restore ecosystems and provide resource benefits. Grand Teton National Park, however, suppresses all human-caused, unplanned fires. Human-caused fires, particularly those in areas of high visitor use, may have safety implications and cause a loss of property and cultural resources. An objective of the park's overall fire management program is reduce human-caused fires.

Visitors to Grand Teton National Park are asked to do their part to prevent unwanted fire incidents. Some important guidelines are listed below.

Building a Safe Campfire

  • Build campfires in designated areas only.
  • Avoid building the fire near overhanging branches, steep slopes, rotten stumps, logs, dry grass, and leaves.
  • Be sure the match you use to light the fire is out cold. Carefully feel the charred portion before discarding it.
  • Keep the campfire small. A good bed of coals or a small fire in a fire ring gives plenty of heat.
  • Never leave a campfire unattended even for a moment. Even a small breeze could quickly cause the fire to spread.
  • Never leave children alone with a campfire. Always have adult supervision.
  • Be careful with gas lanterns, barbeque grills, gas stoves, and anything that can be a source of ignition for a wildland fire.
  • Campfires may be banned during times of high fire danger. Watch for signs and obey the restrictions.

Putting Out a Campfire

  • Keep plenty of water handy and have a shovel for throwing dirt on the fire if it gets out of control.
  • Drown the fire with water. Make sure all embers, coals, and sticks are wet. Ensure there are no burning embers underneath any rocks surrounding the fire.
  • Stir the remains, then add more water and stir again. Be sure all burned material has been put out and cooled.
  • Carefully run the back of your hand near the surface of the fire remains to feel for any heat still being generated.

Smoking

  • Leave at least a 3-foot clearing around the area where you are smoking.
  • Grind out the cigarette, cigar, or pipe tobacco in the dirt before properly disposing of the remains in a trash can or ashtray. Never leave the remains on the ground.
  • Avoid smoking while hiking or riding a horse or bicycle.
  • Use the ashtray while in a vehicle.
  • Never empty the ashtray on the ground.

Suspected Arson
Please note any unusual or suspicious activity around fires. Write down the following information and immediately report it to the Teton Interagency Dispatch Center at (307) 739-3630:

  • Time and place
  • Description of person(s) involved
  • Vehicle license number, make, model, and color

Fire Management Home

Did You Know?

Pika with a mouth full of grass

Did you know that pikas harvest grasses so they can survive the long cold winter? These small members of the rabbit family do not hibernate, but instead store their harvest as “haystacks” under rocks in the alpine environment.