• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

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  • Bears are active in Grand Teton

    Black and grizzly bears are roaming throughout the park--near roads, trails and in backcountry areas. Hikers and backcountry users are advised to travel in groups of three or more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay 100 yards from bears. More »

  • Area closure in effect for trails in the Jenny Lake Area

    A temporary area closure will be in effect for several trails in the Jenny Lake area due to construction activities involving helicopter-assisted transport of heavy material. The closure will last from October 27 through October 30, and possibly longer. More »

  • Multi-use Pathway Closures

    Intermittent closures of the park Multi-use Pathway System will occur through mid-October during asphalt sealing and safety improvement work. Pathway sections will reopen as work is completed. Follow the link for a map and more information. More »

  • Moose-Wilson Road Status

    The Moose-Wilson Road between the Death Canyon Road and the Murie Center Road is currently open to all traffic. The road may re-close at any time due to wildlife activity. For current road conditions call 307-739-3682. More »

Fire Regime

Fire on Blacktail Butte

Fire has been a part of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem for thousands of years. Its presence is important for wildlife habitat, nutrient recycling, plant diversity and overall landscape health. Fire managers at Grand Teton National Park seek to strike a balance between restoring and maintaining natural processes associated with fire, and protecting human life and property.

During the past century, fire was feared and suppressed. This led to a significant and unnatural buildup of live and dead trees, pine needles, shrubs, and grasses. Not only does this buildup create risks for developments near wildland areas, it poses a threat to the health of the forests. Fire naturally thins the forest, recycles nutrients into the soil and stimulates new plant growth. Fire ecology research has shown that many plant and animal species benefit from the rejuvenating effects of fire.

Fire managers at Grand Teton National Park are guided by a comprehensive fire plan that allows the restoration of fire regimes through a full range of management tools. Natural fire, prescribed fire, fire effects monitoring and hazard fuel reduction help restore natural processes while providing for firefighter and public safety. Fire managers work with wildlife biologists, vegetation ecologists, historic preservation specialists, and interagency cooperators to achieve common goals of enhanced habitat and improved ecosystem functions.

Further information on the park's program can be found on the Grand Teton National Park Fire Management Home Page.

Did You Know?

Uinta Ground Squirrel

Did you know that Uinta ground squirrels, sometimes mistaken for prairie dogs, hibernate up to eight months a year? These animals leave their burrows in March or April to inhabit the sagebrush flats, but may return by the end of July.