• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

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  • Bears are active in Grand Teton

    Black and grizzly bears are roaming throughout the park--near roads, trails and in backcountry areas. Hikers and backcountry users are advised to travel in groups of three or more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay 100 yards from bears. More »

  • Area closure in effect for trails in the Jenny Lake Area

    A temporary area closure will be in effect for several trails in the Jenny Lake area due to construction activities involving helicopter-assisted transport of heavy material. The closure will last from October 27 through October 30, and possibly longer. More »

  • Multi-use Pathway Closures

    Intermittent closures of the park Multi-use Pathway System will occur through mid-October during asphalt sealing and safety improvement work. Pathway sections will reopen as work is completed. Follow the link for a map and more information. More »

  • Moose-Wilson Road Status

    The Moose-Wilson Road between the Death Canyon Road and the Murie Center Road is currently open to all traffic. The road may re-close at any time due to wildlife activity. For current road conditions call 307-739-3682. More »

Non-native Species

Thistle is a pernicious weed that is difficult to remove and crowds out native vegetation that animals depend on.

Thistle is a weed that can crowd out native vegetation, leading to forage and habitat loss for wildlife in the park.



Grand Teton National Park is home to a large number of plant and animal species, unfortunately some of these species do not occur here naturally. Non-native species out-compete the native plants and animals for resources leading to a decrease in habitat for native species and biodiversity.

Park scientists fight noxious weeds with mechanical (hand or tool control), chemical, biological and cultural controls. Biological controls involve using native predators of the weed (usually insects) to control its spread. Cultural controls include educating people about the dangers of noxious weeds and changing their behavior to avoid further weed spread. The park is also involved with local agencies, groups, and individuals to help control the spread of non-native weeds in the Jackson Hole valley. Visit http://www.jhwma.org for more information on this cooperative effort.

The park also hosts non-native aquatic species such as the New Zealand Mud Snail. Many varieties of non-native fish such as lake and brown trout are found in many of the park's streams and lakes. The park is actively working to control the spread of all types of exotic species and are having some success, especially with a few of the plant species. These control efforts will be ongoing for many years.

Did You Know?

Close-up of trumpeter swan head

Did you know that Grand Teton National Park is home to the largest bird in North America? The Trumpeter Swan weighs 20-30 pounds and lives in the valley year-round in quiet open water.