• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Bears are active in Grand Teton

    Black and grizzly bears are roaming throughout the park--near roads, trails and in backcountry areas. Hikers and backcountry users are advised to travel in groups of three or more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay 100 yards from bears. More »

  • Area closure in the area around Baxter's Pinnacle

    An area closure is in effect around Baxter's Pinnacle to protect nesting peregrine falcons. This closure precludes any climbs of Baxter's Pinnacle and usage of the walk-off gully. This closure will be in effect through 8-15-2013. More »

Bears

Grizzly_Bear-250px

Bears are common in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem and should be considered "wild" animals.

NPS Photo

What kind of bear did you see? Both grizzly bears and black bears live in the park and parkway. Color is misleading - both species can vary from blonde-black. Watch our video podcast to test your knowledge.

If you see a bear, please report it to the nearest visitor center or ranger station. Bear Sighting and Incident Report

 
blackbear_comparison

Outline of a Black Bear's body.

NPS Photo

BLACK BEAR Ursus americanus

  • No distinctive shoulder hump
  • Face profile is straight from nose to tip of ears
  • Ears are tall and pointed
  • Front claws are short and curved (1"-2" long)

Learn more: Wikipedia>American Black Bear

 
grizzly_comparison

Outline of a Grizzly Bear's body.

NPS Photo

GRIZZLY BEAR Ursus arctos horribilis

  • Distinctive shoulder hump
  • Face profile appears dished in
  • Ears are short and rounded
  • Front claws are long and less curved (2"-4" long)

Learn more: Wikipedia>Grizzly Bear

 

For annual briefs with updated wildlife status information visit the Greater Yellowstone Science and Learning Center.

To purchase books about bears or other wildlife, please visit the Grand Teton Association.

Never approach a bear.
Never feed a bear.
Stay 100 yards (1 football field) from bears at all times.

Did You Know?

Close-up of a lodgepole pine cone

Did you know that lodgepole pine trees grow on glacial moraines in Jackson Hole? Glacial moraines are ridges of rocky debris left behind as Ice Age glaciers melted. The soil on these ridges retains moisture and is more hospitable to trees than the cobbly, porous soil on the outwash plain.