• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Seasonal road closures in effect

    Seasonal road closures are in effect for motorized vehicles. The Teton Park Road is closed from the Taggart Lake Trailhead to the Signal Mountain Lodge. The Moose-Wilson Road is closed from the Granite Canyon Trailhead to the Death Canyon Road. More »

  • Avalanche hazards exist in the park

    Avalanche hazards exist in the park, especially in mountain canyons and on exposed slopes. A daily avalanche forecast can be found at www.jhavalanche.org or by calling (307) 733-2664. More »

  • Bears emerging from hibernation

    Bears are beginning to emerge from hibernation. Travel in groups of three of more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay at least 100 yards from bears. More »

Western Center for Historic Preservation Partners

Students from YMCA dechinking the Hartgrave cabin and peeling logs for White Grass.
 

The Western Center for Historic Preservation and the National Park Service are only able to achieve their far-reaching preservation goals through the contributions of several private and public partners. Through volunteerism and financial assistance, the following organizations have played a critical role in the WCHP's success.

Grand Teton Association

Grand Teton National Park Foundation

Historic Preservation Training Center and the Preservation and Skills Training (PAST) program

Jackson Hole Historical Society and Museum

National Trust for Historic Preservation

(the NTHP has been instrumental in the development of the WCHP and the rehabilitation of the White Grass Dude Ranch. Please visit this site to find out how you can lend financial support to the White Grass Rehabilitation Project).

Michigan Volunteers

Teton County Historic Preservation Board

Wisconsin Teacher Restoration Corp

Youth Conservation Program

If you would like to become a partner, please visit our Get Involved page.

Did You Know?

Beaver Dick Leigh and his family.

Did you know that Jenny and Leigh Lakes are named for the fur trapper “Beaver” Dick Leigh and his wife Jenny (not pictured)? Beaver Dick and Jenny assisted the Hayden party that explored the region in 1872. This couple impressed the explorers to the extent that they named the lakes in their honor.