• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Seasonal road closures in effect

    Seasonal road closures are in effect for motorized vehicles. The Teton Park Road is closed from the Taggart Lake Trailhead to the Signal Mountain Lodge. The Moose-Wilson Road is closed from the Granite Canyon Trailhead to the Death Canyon Road. More »

  • Avalanche hazards exist in the park

    Avalanche hazards exist in the park, especially in mountain canyons and on exposed slopes. A daily avalanche forecast can be found at www.jhavalanche.org or by calling (307) 733-2664. More »

  • Bears emerging from hibernation

    Bears are beginning to emerge from hibernation. Travel in groups of three of more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay at least 100 yards from bears. More »

Teton Tidbits

About This Blog

Welcome to Grand Teton National Park’s blog. Here you will find posts from various park staff that will give you a glimpse into what happens behind the scenes here in Grand Teton, who we are, and what we do. You will also find posts that highlight park projects and operations. You can expect new posts here every Wednesday. We welcome you to send feedback and suggestions for future topics to this email address jenny_anzelmo-sarles@nps.gov.

Park Cleanup Day

May 30, 2012 Posted by: Grand Teton National Park

Wow- some interesting trash gets left behind in Grand Teton National Park. Did you leave your glasses, or maybe a bag of bait fish, Van Gogh’s ear (not sure how that fits into a national park vacation), how about a zen garden?

 

Welcome!

May 15, 2012 Posted by: Grand Teton National Park

I can’t tell you how often National Park Service (NPS) employees, not just in Grand Teton but across the country, get asked what it’s like to be a park ranger. They want to know what our lives are like, where we live, and how we got a job working for the NPS.

 

Did You Know?

Mt. Moran in July

Did you know that the black stripe, or dike, on the face of Mount Moran is 150 feet wide and extends six or seven miles westward? The black dike was once molten magma that squeezed into a crack when the rocks were deep underground, and has since been lifted skyward by movement on the Teton fault.