• St. John's Chapel, Green Springs

    Green Springs

    Virginia

John Morris Advertises the Sale of Sylvania, 1831-1832

[Richmond Enquirer, October 21, 1831:]

[Themes: agriculture—crop types, livestock types; slavery—presence of overseer]

GREEN SPRINGS LAND FOR SALE

BY virtue of the authority vested in me, by the will of William Morris, deceased, will be sold to the highest bidder, at the late residence of the said William Morris, in the county of Louisa, near the Green Springs, on the 24th November next, if fair, if not, the next fair day, a tract of land, of about 1500 acres, being a part of the land on which William Morris resided, a large portion of which is land of superior quality, and would make a most desirable residence. The land will be divided to suit purchasers. Those disposed to purchase, are invited to view the land before the day of sale, which will be shown them either by my brother, Jos W. Morris, or by Mr. B[au?]gham, the Overseer, residing on the place.

At the same time and place, will be sold all the tock of horses, cows, sheep and hogs, plantation utensils, household and kitchen furniture, the crop of corn, fodder, &c.

On the third Monday in December next, at Goochland Court-house, I shall sell to the highest bidder, a tract of land, lying in Goochland county, called Southall’s, containing 400 acres, adjoining the land of Stephen Woodson, and others.

Terms—The lands will be sold on a credit of one, two, and three years, the purchasers giving bond with approved security, and a deed of trust on the land, to secure the payment as they fall due.—For the personal property, a credit of twelve months will be given for all sums over $20, the purchaser giving bond with approved security; for all sums of $20 and under, cash will be required. JNO MORRIS,

Ex’or of William Morris, dec’d.

The Charlottesville Advocate is requested to insert the above, once a week [until?] day of sale, and send the account to the Whig office for collection.

Oct. 14 [, 1831]. 45—w3[?]*

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[Richmond Enquirer, June 15, 1832:]

[Themes: agriculture—Green Springs as distinct and prized soils-zone, crop types, improved-unimproved ratio; social/group/neighborhood identity and action]

GREEN SPRING LAND FOR SALE.—Will be sold, to the highest bidder, at Louisa Court House, on the second Monday in July next, (that being Louisa Court day,) on a credit of one, two and three years, a TRACT OF LAND, containing 1355 Acres. It is situated in Louisa county, in what is well known as the Green Spring neighborhood, which is, without doubt, the best faming land below the Ridge: It is particularly adapted to the growth of wheat and grass; is as healthy as any part of Virginia, and affords as good society as can be found in the country. About 300 Acres of the land is cleared, the balance is in woods, a large portion of which is Tobacco Land, of superior quality. The Land is well watered, and in all respects most desirable. It will be divided to suit purchasers, if required. Those disposed to purchasers, are invited to view the land before the day of sale, which will be shown by my brother, Joseph W. Morris.

JNO. MORRIS.

Executor of Wm. Morris, dec’d.

May 29 [, 1832]. 6—wtds

Did You Know?

Flower

Green Springs National Historic Landmark District is privately owned, includes no public facilities, but is visible from public highways. It sits astride Route 15 in Louisa County, Virginia.