• Approximately 1,500 black bears live in the national park.

    Great Smoky Mountains

    National Park NC,TN

There are park alerts in effect.
hide Alerts »
  • Trail Advisory

    Several trails in the park are temporarily closed. Please check the "Backcountry Facilities" section of the Temporary Road and Facilities Closures page for further details. More »

Park Receives 2014 Impact Grant from the National Park Foundation to Restore Wetland Vegetation

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
Date: July 2, 2014
Contact: Public Affairs Office, (865) 436-1207

Great Smoky Mountains National Park is one of 23 national parks selected to receive a 2014 Impact Grant from the National Park Foundation, the official charity of America’s national parks. The $25,000 grant supports the restoration of wetland vegetation in a 3-acre wetland in the Ravensford floodplain near Cherokee Central Schools in NC. 

Now in its seventh year, the Impact Grants program provides national parks with the critical financial support they need to transform innovative, yet underfunded, ideas into successful in-park programs and initiatives. 

“Through our Impact Grants, we will help make a profound difference in our national parks by providing much-needed funding for projects that support habitat restoration, wildlife protection, and conservation research,” said Neil Mulholland, President and CEO of the National Park Foundation. 

Wetland habitats are uncommon in the park and provide critical habitat for diverse native plants and animals, some found nowhere else in the park. The unique Ravensford wetland has been severely impaired by invasive exotic plants reducing habitat for native species. Through this project, park staff along with youth volunteers, will remove invasive plants and collect native seed from remnant wetland vegetation that will be used to propagate native species for plantings. Restored wetland vegetation will help create a buffer along the edge of the wetland to better filter sediments and potential contaminants from nearby roads. The restored site will not only improve natural habitat and wetland function, but also provide educational opportunities for park visitors and students.

“We are grateful to the National Park Foundation for providing us the opportunity to both restore this wetland community and provide a unique hands-on learning opportunity,” said Acting Superintendent Cindy MacLeod. “We’ve already had youth assist us from the Cherokee Central School summer culture camp along with the Oconaluftee Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center  and look forward to developing more educational and service opportunities as the restoration continues.”

The 2014 Impact Grants were made possible, in large part, through the support of Disney and Subaru of America. A listing of these parks and their Impact Grants project descriptions can be found on the National Park Foundation website.

For more information on how Smokies biologists identify and map wetlands, please visit http://www.nps.gov/grsm/naturescience/dff7-focusnps2.htm. For more information on the National Park Foundation and how to support and protect America’s national parks, please visitwww.nationalparks.org.

Did You Know?

Fall leaf colors are most vivid at low to mid elevations.

About 100 native tree species make their home in Great Smoky Mountains National Park—more than in all of northern Europe. The park also contains one of the largest blocks of old-growth temperate deciduous forest in North America. More...